American Indian

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Related to Amerindian: Amerindian language, Amerindian music

American Indian

1. a member of any of the indigenous peoples of North, Central, or South America, having Mongoloid affinities, notably straight black hair and a yellow to brown skin
2. of or relating to any of these peoples, their languages, or their cultures
References in periodicals archive ?
A second aspect of Amerindian Catholicism that appears in the documentation generated by the Seven Years' War is the role of Amerindians as Catholic evangelists.
Partners: Guyana REDD+ investment Fund, Ministry of Amerindian Affairs
Researchers said they would keep trying to determine when the Amerindian genes first arrived in Iceland and would seek to link them to burial remains in the Americas.
Increasing seroprevalence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) with age confirms HHV-8 endemicity in Amazon Amerindians from Brazil.
In many ways, Chimalpahin represents the emergence of the Amerindian writer, a figure who played an active role in both narrating and interpreting from the colonized native perspective the drama of the cultures Spain was subjugating.
To understand the second critique, in effect a form of decolonial critique of practical reason, consider these thoughts posed in the South African context, which, I hope will be evident, has much resonance for the Amerindian one.
The Guerin case recognized the federal government's fiduciary responsibility towards Amerindians, a direct consequence of the Crown reserving to itself the right to acquire Amerindian lands in the Royal Proclamation of 1763.
The ethics of anthropology and Amerindian research: reporting on environmental degradation and warfare.
GEORGETOWN, Jumada I, 11, 1434, Mar 23, 2013, SPA -- A United Nations agency is urging Guyana to review the practice of granting mining permits and concessions in indigenous communities before obtaining consent from Amerindians who live there, AP reported.
WaGaNCHe is a fine way to discover the Caribbean's Amerindian heritage, a heritage too often overlooked, but proudly being reclaimed by descendants of the Ciboney and other aboriginal Antillean peoples and increasingly by others seeking to connect Native North America to the Indigenes of Latin America.
Seeman offers an overview of the relations between Amerindian and Europeans in the years following the discovery, conquest, and colonization of the Americas, noting that communication, cooperation and exploitation marked the interactions among the peoples of the Atlantic World.
In his 1970 essay, "History, Fable and Myth in the Caribbean and Guianas," Guyanese writer and cultural theorist Wilson Harris argues that religious and cultural practices associated with the colonized peoples of the Caribbean, such as Haitian vodun, the limbo dance associated with Carnival, and the Shamanism of the Amerindian have been suppressed by both colonial and postcolonial historical discourse.