Amhara

(redirected from Amharas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Amhara

1. a region of NW Ethiopia: formerly a kingdom
2. an inhabitant of the former kingdom of Amhara

Amhara

 

the largest ethnic group in Ethiopia. The Amhara live primarily in the central and northern regions of the country—the provinces of Shoa, Gojjam, and Bagēmder—and also the provinces of Wallo, Arusi, Kaffa, Walagā, Harar, and Sidamo. They speak Amharic. Their numbers have been estimated at 6–7 to 10–11 million people. (More precise calculations are difficult, since today many other peoples speak Amharic.) The Amharas are Monoph-ysitie Christians. (Christianity entered Ethiopia as early as the fourth century A.D.) Their main occupation is farming (maize, sorghum, and legumes); some raise cattle.

REFERENCES

Narody Afriki. Moscow, 1954.
Rait, M. V. Narody Efiopii. Moscow, 1965.
Ullendorff, E. The Ethiopians. London, 1960.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Oromo have already learned that "Ethiopian socialism" under the Amhara military regime and "Ethiopian democracy" under the Tigray regime have been variants of Ethiopian colonial ideologies.
The removal of the monarchy in the early 1970s and later of its army in the 1990s has destroyed the Amhara political base.
In the Ethiopian ethnic-class hierarchy, the Tigrayans were located next to the Amhara.
Some Oromo place names were replaced with Amhara ones.
1981 "The Oromo Nation Under Amhara Colonial Administration.
The ethnic federalism that was instituted by the Tigrayan-based Ethiopian government also failed to provide internal legitimacy in the colonized states such as Oromia because the replacement the Amhara power by that of Tigray was unable to change the essence and characteristics of the Ethiopian colonial state.
The Amhara and Tigrayan colonial settlers, their supporters, and their state developed garrison and non-garrison cities as one of their central institutions to control, suppress, and exploit the Oromo people.
Ethiopia has remained an empire of darkness and ignorance and the leadership coming from either Amhara or Tigrayan society has failed to fulfill the responsibilities of a modern state.
Social Stratification in Traditional Amhara Society," Social Stratification in Africa, Arthur Tuden and Leonard Plotricov (eds.