Ammoniation of Feed

Ammoniation of Feed

 

the treatment of feed with ammonia in order to increase its nitrogen content. The ammonia combines with the organic acids in the feed to form ammonium salts; this nonprotein nitrogen is used by the microflora in the rumen of ruminants for the synthesis of microbic proteins which are a source of amino acids for the animals. Up to 30 percent of the protein in the diet of ruminants can be replaced by this nitrogen obtained from ammonia.

Usually corn silage, acidic or dry sugar-beet pulp, molasses, distillery slops, and straw are ammoniated. The ammoniation process involves the treatment of the feed with ammonia water of various concentrations—most frequently 25 percent ammonia. After the ammonia water is diluted (1 liter per 3–4 l of water), it is added in the following amounts to the feed: 12–15 l per ton of corn silage, 70–80 l per ton of dry sugar-beet pulp, and 120 l per ton of straw. The feed is treated in straw-covered piles; in pits, vats, and tanks; and, in the case of straw, in stacks. The ammoniated feed is used after the odor of ammonia has disappeared.

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