Ammophila


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Ammophila

 

a genus of plants of the family Gramineae. The perennial grasses range in height from 0.5 to 1 m and have creeping rhizomes. The plants form a thick turf. The leaf blades are stenolinear. The inflorescence is a long and dense cylindrical panicle, and the spikelets are single-flowered and strongly laterally compressed. The glumes are stenolanceolate and keeled. The lemmas, which are leathery and have three to five ribs, are shorter than or the same length as the glumes.

There are two species of Ammophila, distributed in Europe, North Africa, and eastern North America. They grow on sandy coastal soils and dunes. In the USSR, the European beach grass (A. arenaria) grows on the coasts and islands of the Baltic Sea. The plant is sometimes used to stabilize sandy coastal soils and dunes.

References in classic literature ?
Bergson, quoting Fabre, has made play with the supposed extraordinary accuracy of the solitary wasp Ammophila, which lays its eggs in a caterpillar.
According to Fabre's observations, which Bergson accepts, the Ammophila stings its prey EXACTLY and UNERRINGLY in EACH of the nervous centres.
Other specimens collected from weed flowers with entomological nets were: Pepsis aciculata Taschenberg, Sphex lucae Saussure, Dipogon subintermedius Magretti (recorded in Mexico for first time), Triscolia ardens Smith, Ammophila spp.
2120 - Shifting dunes along the shoreline with Ammophila arenaria ("white dunes")
Determining the Appropriate Scale: Phytometric Analysis of Ammophila breviligulata, Potentilla anserina, and Juncus balticus.
Like Ammophila arenaria caryopses grown in the laboratory [2], the caryopses of these species have an optimal germination in the temperature range 15-25[degrees]C.
NMSA prey records include (sex of predator in brackets): Hymenoptera (2): Sphecidae, Ammophila sp.
Development of a negative plant-soil feedback in the expansion zone of the clonal grass Ammophila arenaria following root formation and nematode colonization.
The first sphecine, Chalybion californicum (de Saussure), was collected on 30 May, and the last, Ammophila urnaria Dahlbom, on 10 October.
This species matures much earlier than Rabidosa rabida and Hogna ammophila (Wallace, 1942), two large lycosids occurring in the same habitats.
The role of plant-parasitic nematodes and soil-born fungi in the decline of Ammophila.