amniote

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amniote

[′am·nē‚ōt]
(zoology)
An animal that develops an amnion during its embryonic stage; includes birds, reptiles, and mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
canicula the DTmesV formed in the mesencephalon early (Figures 4(b) and 4(c)), reminiscent of amniotes [4, 5].
Finally, tetrapod remains from amniotes were recovered from the Balearic Islands, including cranial and postcranial material (Cala Pilar, Menorca Island) (13) (Pretus and Obrador, 1987), being nowadays under preparation and study.
Hylonomus lyelli, meaning "forest dweller", named in honour of his mentor and friend, Sir Charles, a century and a half later was proclaimed Nova Scotia's Provincial fossil and remains the earliest known amniote in the fossil record (Carroll 1964, 1970; Reisz 1997; Clack 2002).
The human embryonic circulatory system is a modification of that used in other amniotes, such as birds and reptiles.
They have long believed two groups of animals - amphibians and amniotes - evolved from common ancestors hundreds of millions of years ago.
Higher developmental temperatures generally lead to more trunk vertebrae in amniotes (Fox et al.
A prominent example of this coordination is found in the gastrulation of amniotes, where Brachyury (Bra), a transcription factor, is synchronously and transiently expressed in a localized population, the Primitive Streak (PS).
We can conclude, therefore, that the subsequent diversification of Palaeozoic amniotes and the rise of small and large omnivorous, herbivorous and predatory forms arose from these modest beginnings," they added.
Odd as they are, turtles clearly belong to the lineage of amniotes, which includes mammals, birds and reptiles.
For example, humans are included in the following nested clades (using the informal names): eukaryotes, animals, deuterostomes, vertebrates, gnathostomes, tetrapods, amniotes, mammals, eutherians, primates, monkeys, apes, and great apes (see Dawkins, 2004 for more information on the ancestry of humans).
In their review of the evolution of intelligence, Emery and Clayton (2004) note that "divergent brain evolution" has resulted in substantial differences across amniotes in brain organization at the cellular level.
Aves, Chelonia, Squamata, or Crocodylia) would aid in determining major patterns of cranial development and evolution in amniotes.