amphibole

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amphibole

(ăm`fəbōl'), any of a group of widely distributed rock-forming minerals, magnesium-iron silicates, often with traces of calcium, aluminum, sodium, titanium, and other elements. The amphibole minerals are closely related in crystal structure, but they crystallize in two different systems, orthorhombic and monoclinic; their close structural relationship is reflected in uniform prism angles of about 56° and 124° and in good cleavages parallel to these prisms. They are commonly green to black, but may be colorless, white, yellow, blue, or brown. The amphibole minerals are found both in igneous and metamorphic rocks. The commonest form is hornblende; other species include anthophyllite, cummingtonite, tremolite, actinolite, riebeckite, and glaucophane. A variety of jade, called nephrite, consists of actinolite in a finely fibrous form.

amphibole

[′am·fə‚bōl]
(mineralogy)
Any of a group of rock-forming, ferromagnesian silicate minerals commonly found in igneous and metamorphic rocks; includes hornblende, anthophyllite, tremolite, and actinolite (asbestos minerals).
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the majority of the homes had VAI insulation containing amphibole asbestos, it is very likely that the insulation was derived from the Libby, Montana, Zonolite Mine.
suggesting that chrysotile asbestos associated with residential commercial products may pose a greater potential exposure risk to home occupants than amphibole asbestos from VAI.
Subjects with asbestosis have higher amphibole asbestos fiber counts than those with pleural plaques or mesothelioma.
It may, therefore, be assumed that ferruginous bodies with a thin core nearly always represent amphibole asbestos.
Autoantibodies from mice exposed lo Libby amphibole asbestos bind SSA/ Ro52-enriched apoptotic blebs of murine macrophages.
2])] and two types of amphibole asbestos, International Union Against Cancer (UICC) crocidolite and Libby amphibole.
Crocidolite and Libby amphibole asbestos induced dose-dependent increases in micronuclei in control cells, which were enhanced by XRCC1 deficiency.
The decades of occupational and environmental exposure to amphibole asbestos in Libby have been linked to a high incidence of asbestos-related diseases including fibrosis, pleural plaques, and cancer.
Naturally occurring amphibole asbestos is not a problem when left underground.
The monitoring comes in the wake of another town's recently publicized experience: occupational and environmental exposure to amphibole asbestos in the small mining town of Libby, Montana, resulting in deaths and other widespread health effects.
This finding is extremely important for guiding future public health assessments of exposure to vermiculite from the Libby mine and exposure to amphibole asbestos in general.
Exposure to amphibole asbestos is associated with the development of mesotheliomas, lung cancers, and fibrotic lung diseases (1,2).