Amphitryon

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Amphitryon

(ămfĭ`trēən, –ŏn'), in Greek mythology, son of Alcaeus. While betrothed to Alcmene, he accidentally killed her father, Electryon. Alcmene and Amphitryon fled to Thebes, but she demanded that he defeat Pterelaos, her father's enemy. This Amphitryon did, but on the night of his return Zeus took Amphitryon's form and came into Alcmene's bed. That night she conceived children by both Zeus and Amphitryon. Hercules was the son of Zeus, Iphicles the son of Amphitryon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on the many early modern adaptations of the "Plautine door knocking and lock-out in Amphitruo," Robert Miola draws attention to Adriana's "expanded role" in Shakespeare's play (Leggatt 1974, 24).
When Adriana goes upstairs to dine with her husband's double, to the heimlich chamber, Shakespeare's source shifts wholly to The Amphitruo.
213) is marked by some of the Sosia-Mercury sauciness in Amphitruo.
The element of comic horror that Sosia of Amphitruo feels and that some critics, as mentioned above, detect in Shakespeare's play is mostly absent here, as is the element of intimidation.
argues that Comedy, particularly Plautine, can introduce gods and lofty material into its plot-lines without compromising its identity and she uses Amphitruo as her example and analogy and in support of her characterisation of the fable as a story in the comic genre.
The beginning point centers around the plays of Plautus, especially Menaechmi, Amphitruo, Mostellaria, Captivi, Miles Gloriosus, Casina, and Rudens, and of Terence, especially Andria, Eunuchus, Hecyra, and Adelphoe.