amyloid

(redirected from Amyloid plaques)
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Related to Amyloid plaques: amyloidosis, Neurofibrillary tangles

amyloid

[′am·ə‚lȯid]
(pathology)
An abnormal protein deposited in tissues, formed from the infiltration of an unknown substance, probably a carbohydrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Phase 1b placebo-controlled study of aducanumab in prodromal and mild AD patients published in Nature demonstrated that it reduced amyloid plaques in the brain as seen through PET imaging, and that this reduction was dose- and time-dependent (Images 1, 2 and 3).
Researchers at Braincure Biotech prefer the latter approach, considering that the loss of the G protein-coupled receptor 3 (abbreviated GPR3) could reduce the amyloid plaque accumulation and increase cognitive functions.
Medical science has only been able to detect the presence of amyloid plaques in their early stages for the past few years.
Astrocyte activation peaks roughly twenty years before the expected symptoms and then goes into decline, in contrast to the accumulation of amyloid plaques, which increases constantly over time until clinical symptoms show.
Our study shows that both higher levels of HDL - good - and lower levels of LDL - bad - cholesterol in the bloodstream are associated with lower levels of amyloid plaque deposits in the brain," said study leader professor Bruce Reed, from the University of California at Davis (UC Davis).
Caption: When administered during a PET scan, flutemetamol binds to amyloid plaques in the brain.
The density of amyloid plaque decreased significantly after day 14.
Researchers in St Louis tested the sleep patterns of 100 people aged 45 to 80, and found that 25% of the participants had evidence of amyloid plaques, which can appear years before the symptoms of Alzheimer's begin.
Gantenerumab acts by binding to the amyloid plaques.
In fact, a recent failure involved an antibody that cleared the amyloid plaques out of the AD brain.
A clinical trial is under way at the University of California to test curcumin's effects in Alzheimer's patients and on their amyloid plaque proteins.
The drugs, all available in generic form, appear to block formation of sticky wads of protein called amyloid plaques that build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients.