An Lu-shan

An Lu-shan

(än lo͞o-shän), d.757, Chinese general of the T'ang dynasty. Of mixed Sogdian and Turkish birth, he was appointed regional commander on the northeastern frontier. In 755 he led c.200,000 troops in revolt against the T'ang central government. Emperor Hsüan-tsungHsüan-tsung
, 685–762, Chinese emperor (712–56), 9th of the T'ang dynasty. Under his brilliant early rule the T'ang reached the height of its power. Improved administration and new grain-transport facilities increased the flow of revenue to the central
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 fled the capital Chang'an for Sichuan, and on the way he was forced by discontented soldiers to execute his concubine Yang Kuei-feiYang Kuei-fei
, 719–56, concubine of the T'ang emperor Hsüan-tsung. The most famous beauty in Chinese history, in legend she is said to have captivated the emperor who then neglected state affairs.
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, who was blamed for demoralizing the court and was even rumored to have had a secret affair with An Lu-shan. An Lu-shan was killed by his son in 757. The rebellion lasted until 763, when foreign troops helped restore the T'ang dynasty to power.

An Lu-shan

 

(original surname K’ang, first name Yaloshan). Died 757. Chinese military leader and member of the Hu tribe.

An Lu-shan entered military service and distinguished himself in battles with the Khitans in 736. In 742, he was appointed military vicegerent (chiehtushih) of the P’inglu Border District in northern China. Subsequently, An Lu-shan received new posts with the help of the T’ang emperor Hsüan Tsung’s concubine Yang Kuei-Fei, who supported and adopted him. He was also appointed vicegerent of the Fanyang District (the present-day province of Hopeh) in 744 and of the Hotung District (the present-day province of Shansi) in 751. With complete power concentrated in his hands in three of the ten border districts of the T’ang empire and with considerable military forces at his command, An Lu-shan stirred up a revolt in 755 and proclaimed himself emperor in 756. He was killed by his own son, An Ch’ing-hsiu.

References in classic literature ?
Tu Fu in `The Old Man of Shao-Ling' leaves us this memory of his peaceful days passed in the capital, before the ambition of the Turkic general An Lu-shan had driven his master into exile in far Ssuch`uan.
His book, The Background of the Rebellion of An Lu-shan (Oxford Univ.
These and the other six items ("The Shun-tsung Shih-lu," "Liu K'o, a Forgotten Rival of Han Yu," "A Sogdian Colony in Inner Mongolia," "Registration of Population in China in the Sui and T'ang Periods," "The An Lu-shan Rebellion and the Origins of Chronic Militarism in Late T'ang China," "The Origins and Nature of Chattel Slavery in Ancient China") included in this volume are lasting contributions to scholarship.
Principal wars: T'ang Frontier Wars (741-755); An Lu-shan Rebellion (755-763).
The An Lu-shan Rebellion drove the imperial court out of north China temporarily and marked the beginning of the great decline in the political fortunes of the empire.
Principal wars: war with Arabs and Tibetans (747-751); rebellion of An Lu-shan (755-763).