An Lu-shan

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An Lu-shan

(än lo͞o-shän), d.757, Chinese general of the T'ang dynasty. Of mixed Sogdian and Turkish birth, he was appointed regional commander on the northeastern frontier. In 755 he led c.200,000 troops in revolt against the T'ang central government. Emperor Hsüan-tsungHsüan-tsung
, 685–762, Chinese emperor (712–56), 9th of the T'ang dynasty. Under his brilliant early rule the T'ang reached the height of its power. Improved administration and new grain-transport facilities increased the flow of revenue to the central
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 fled the capital Chang'an for Sichuan, and on the way he was forced by discontented soldiers to execute his concubine Yang Kuei-feiYang Kuei-fei
, 719–56, concubine of the T'ang emperor Hsüan-tsung. The most famous beauty in Chinese history, in legend she is said to have captivated the emperor who then neglected state affairs.
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, who was blamed for demoralizing the court and was even rumored to have had a secret affair with An Lu-shan. An Lu-shan was killed by his son in 757. The rebellion lasted until 763, when foreign troops helped restore the T'ang dynasty to power.

An Lu-shan

 

(original surname K’ang, first name Yaloshan). Died 757. Chinese military leader and member of the Hu tribe.

An Lu-shan entered military service and distinguished himself in battles with the Khitans in 736. In 742, he was appointed military vicegerent (chiehtushih) of the P’inglu Border District in northern China. Subsequently, An Lu-shan received new posts with the help of the T’ang emperor Hsüan Tsung’s concubine Yang Kuei-Fei, who supported and adopted him. He was also appointed vicegerent of the Fanyang District (the present-day province of Hopeh) in 744 and of the Hotung District (the present-day province of Shansi) in 751. With complete power concentrated in his hands in three of the ten border districts of the T’ang empire and with considerable military forces at his command, An Lu-shan stirred up a revolt in 755 and proclaimed himself emperor in 756. He was killed by his own son, An Ch’ing-hsiu.

References in periodicals archive ?
Since the calendar tables compiled by Chen Yuan and other scholars do not include any sixth or sixteenth year with intercalated second month during the relevant period, it seems likely that the fragment was written at a time of poor communication between the Western Regions and the Tang government, probably some time between the rebellion of An Lushan in 755 and the Tibetan occupation of Khotan at the end of the eighth century.
5 9 Timur (1370-1405) 17 10 Atlantic slave trade (1452-1807) 16 11 Conquest of the Americas (after 1492) 15 12 First World War (1914-1918) 15 13 An Lushan Rebellion (755-763) 13 14 Xin Dynasty (9-24) 10 15 Congo Free State (1885-1908) 10 16 Russian Civil War (1918-1920) 9 17 Thirty-Year War (1618-1648) 7.
Nevertheless, erudite scholarship is evident in all nine tightly packed thematic chapters that take the An Lushan rebellion as the pivotal point dividing the Tang dynasty into two halves--before and after the rebellion (geography of empire, foundation to rebellion, warlords and monopolists, urban life, rural society, outer world, kinship, religion, and writing).
Employed by the Tang government during the An Lushan Rebellion (755-783), Shenhui was able to sell his lineage along with the ordination certificates he was hawking to refill the state's coffers.
For example, he pardoned the mutinous general An Lushan whom many believed, at least retrospectively, should have been sentenced to death.
In 755 An Lushan rebelled against the Tang dynasty and the Chinese empire disintegrated.
To prevent the reoccurence of the disastrous An Lushan rebellion of 755, when a powerful border general nearly toppled the mighty Tang dynasty (618--907), [92] Ming rulers chose to concentrate a very large proportion of their forces close to the capital, where presumably they would be under closer supervision and tighter control.
At the end of the Tianbao era (742-755) of the Tang, when An Lushan had sacked both capital cities, Xuanzong had moved to Shu, and appointed Lin among other posts as military commissioner and investigation commissioner of the four circuits of Shannan, Lingnan, Qianzhong, and Jiangnan.
However, Hucker's account is, to my knowledge, false, as previous dynasties like the Tang, for example, also sold certificates during the An Lushan rebellion.
As to why such practices came about, Groner speculates that the sale of ordination certificates in the wake of the An Lushan rebellion may have weakened their meaning, leading to a kind of reform movement that emphasized practice over the outward trappings of monasticism (pp.
Rong Xinjiang's "The Religious Background to the An Lushan Rebellion" is, according to its author, a completely rewritten essay that is now double the length of its earlier Chinese iterations.
One extreme example is that of the elephants and rhinoceroses forcibly brought to Luoyang following the An Lushan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] rebellion.