Anacreon

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Anacreon

(ənăk`rēən, –ŏn), c.570–c.485 B.C., Greek lyric poet, b. Teos in Ionia. He lived at Samos and at Athens, where his patron was Hipparchus. His poetry, graceful and elegant, celebrates the joys of wine and love. Little of his verse survives. Anacreontics, poems in the style of Anacreon, were written from Hellenistic to late Byzantine times.

Anacreon

 

Born about 570 B.C.; died about 487 B.C. Ancient Greek poet.

The basic motifs in Anacreon’s lyric poetry, of which only small fragments have been preserved, are sensual love, wine, and a carefree life. Poems of this style later became known as Anacreontic poems. A. S. Pushkin, L. A. Mei, and others translated Anacreon into Russian.

WORKS

[“Fragments.”] In Poetae melici graeci. Edited by D. Page. Oxford, 1962.
In Russian translation:
Anakreont: Pervoe polnoe sobr. ego soch. v perevodakh russkikh pisatelei. Edited by A. Tambovskii. St. Petersburg, [1896].
[“Fragmenty.”] In Grecheskaia epigramma.[Moscow, 1960.]

REFERENCE

Iarkho, V., and K. Polonskaia. Antichnaia lirika. Moscow, 1967.

Anacreon

(563–478 B.C.) Greek lyric poet who idealized the pleasures of love. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Love

Anacreon

(563–478 B. C.) Greek lyric poet who praised the effects of wine. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 31]
See: Wine

Anacreon

?572--?488 bc, Greek lyric poet, noted for his short songs celebrating love and wine
References in periodicals archive ?
Moore's Anacreontic drinking songs in Irish Melodies include "Come, Send Round the Wine" (234), "One Bumper at Parting" (245), and "The Wine Cup is Circling" (270), which share the common theme of drinking as a release from normative life.
20) Examples are iambo-trochaic rhythm (mentioned by some theorists as "mode 7") the tribrachic-trochaic of CSM 139, which is the presumable rhythm of 'Astra tenent', and the Anacreontic CSM 213 (see "Cum doctorum" discussed later).
A great admirer of Pierre-Paul Prud'hon and Antonio Canova, Sommariva had a taste for elegant Neoclassicism and the Anacreontic sensuality of the pre-Revolutionary days.
End quote Over the 40 or so years of its existence the Anacreontic Society amassed no less than 1,505 members, at which point the register ceases to record them.
Its sentiments might be associated with some of the eighteenth-century ideologues, including Schiller himself: joy as the fountainhead of universal community, deism and Nature; joy that suffuses the anacreontic rituals of human bonding.
The Anacreontic Rose," in cui si rileva come i poeti di questo gruppo--tra cui Bodini, Cattafi e Gatto--possiedano un elevato senso delle qualita sensuali e meliche della parola poetica e, tipica dello stile barocco, una struttura dualistica all'interno del verso.
That the author allows the occurrences of the rose in contemporary Italian poetry to dictate the book's organization forces us to consider these poets from less common perspectives: alongside (and very often in place of) the traditional categories of Twilight, Futurist, Hermetic, and Neo-Hermetic poets, we hear also of poets of advent and of otium, as well as encyclopedic, apotropaic, and Anacreontic poets.
Desig de terra, which at times contains subtle anacreontic echoes, is excellent poetry and a delight to read.
Brown's fascination with minor registers of musico-literary history resumes in the final sequence of chapters, beginning with an argument for the rich "inertial gloom" of oft-maligned mid-century English poetry, which influenced Handel's solemn oratorios, and ending with a revelatory survey of eighteenth-century anacreontic lyric.
In the first chapter Felix Budelmann and Johannes Haubold discuss the relationship between tradition and reception by looking at the traditions of Homeric epic and Anacreontic lyric.
Includes: Daniel Schafer, "Medical Representations of Old Age in the Renaissance: The Influence of Non-Medical Texts"; Nina Taunton, "Time's Whirligig: Images of Old Age in Coriolanus, Francis Bacon, and Thomas Newton"; Stella Achilleos, "Youth, Old Age and Male Self-Fashioning: The Appropriation of the Anacreontic Figure of the Old Man by Jonson and his 'Sons'"; Maria Teresa Ricci, "Old Age in Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier"; Kevin P.
The standard accounts of German literature consign Uz not merely to the "sweetly sentimental" but the neoclassically frivolous summed up in the disapproving tag Anacreontic, a mid-eighteenth-century literary movement early Romantics deemed inauthentic given its reputation (not always accurate) for decorousness.