anaerobic bacteria


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anaerobic bacteria

[¦an·ə¦rōb·ik ‚bak′tir·ē·ə]
(microbiology)
Any bacteria that can survive in the partial or complete absence of air; two types are facultative and obligate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of anaerobic bacteria isolated in Pretoria, South Africa, during 2003-2004.
The UMC Groningen will organize subsequent proficiency tests to establish this approach as the standard for anaerobic bacteria identification.
Applicable for managers in modern clinical and industrial laboratories, this white paper compares three forms of anaerobic bacteria culturing technologies and explores how hospital and research laboratories are using the new technology to quickly create ideal conditions for the growth of anaerobic organisms.
Anaerobic bacteria are microbes that don't require oxygen to grow.
If any test results indicate the presence of anaerobic bacteria or coliform bacteria--or if the well owner is experiencing cloudy water, low water flow, or taste and odor problems--NGWA recommends having the well cleaned by a qualified water well system contractor prior to any servicing of the well system.
1 1 Table 2: Spatial distribution of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in digesters containing different feedstocks.
In the present screening we have analyzed 18 aerobic and 9 anaerobic bacteria strains, 2 Candida strains and 1 M.
8-11) Clindamycin and ornidazole are used in the treatment of infections caused by anaerobic bacteria.
They treat the bacteria one by one in sections on gram-positive cocci, gram-positive bacilli, gram-negative organisms, spiral bacteria, and obligate anaerobic bacteria.
The FDA recommends that if physicians suspect infection in patients with this presentation, they should consider immediately initiating treatment with antibiotics that include coverage of anaerobic bacteria, such as Clostridium sordellii.
In the journal article, Rutgers said the researchers detail a way to facilitate the of anaerobic bacteria in cleaning up MTBE by employing carbon isotope fractionation -- the changes in the isotopic ratios of carbon (its different molecular versions, carbon-12 and carbon-13) brought about from the selective degradation of the carbon-12 form in the case of MTBE.
Additionally, anaerobic bacteria thrive in these new conditions and can cause a number of problems.