Anamorphic image

Anamorphic image

A distorted image that must be viewed in a special mirror in order to become recognizable.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The instructions include directions for making an exact, mathematically correct anamorphic image that involves a mapping or correspondence between a cartesian and polar set of coordinates.
This softness may relate to the Sony's ability to downmix an anamorphic image to letterbox form quite well, because the movies that were A/B compared were anamorphically squeezed.
Only when the viewer moves to the side, almost up against the wall, does the anamorphic image of the landscape begin to appear.
GRAND CINEMA' is said to be compatible with all video sources, including High Definition ATSC and supports both 4:3 and 16:9 anamorphic image formats.
56) Thus the same method that he used in the earlier book to foreshorten a chair [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 6 OMITTED] is employed to make an anamorphic image of a chair [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 7 OMITTED].
Both Niceron, who lived in the Paris "convent," and Emanuel Maignan, another monk who resided for a short time at the Minim chapter house in Rome at Santa Trinita dei Monti before moving to Toulouse, not only wrote about perspective but also produced a number of different types of anamorphic images, some of immense dimensions, which took up entire walls of both the Roman and Parisian chapter houses.
According to him, this approach to the problem of the influence of visual culture based on its reception offers the possibility to include images that modern readers would not recognize as equivalent to anamorphic images but that could have been understood as such by men of letters and readers of the time.
AFP Generator Enhancements: Anamorphic images support added for AFP IOCA objects.
Unlike Dibbets and a handful of other artists who worked with anamorphic images in the relative isolation of their studios or in abandoned buildings, Zanela wanted to take anamorphosis to the streets.
William Cochran has become well known for his trompe l'oeil (tromp loy) style and anamorphic images, which prompt viewers to question their perceptions of what is real and what is an illusion.
Perhaps the most famous example is Holbein's The Ambassadors (reproduced, along with other anamorphic images, in Castillo's text), which displays, near the bottom of the painting, a peculiar oblong shape that, viewed from the side, reveals itself to be the image of a human skull.
In this way there are fewer problems with anamorphic images where magnification may produce a skewed image in one direction.