Anatahan


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Anatahan,

uninhabited volcanic island, 12.5 sq mi (32 sq km), Saipan dist., Northern Mariana Islands, in the W Pacific Ocean some 85 mi (140 km) N of Saipan. The island is dominated by two overlapping calderas and two peaks that reach 2,343 ft (714 m) and 2,585 ft (788 m) high. No eruptions of the volcano were recorded in historical times until 2003, when an explosive eruption began in the smaller, eastern caldera.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, Douglas Morrey enjoys displaying Rivette at his most brazen (defending Sternberg's Anatahan, finding Eisenstein liturgical), but he does so to get at the personal, nearly religious attitude with which Rivette and Co.
About 100 miles north of Saipan, in what is rather blandly labeled "the second island chain," is a little scrap of land called Anatahan.
We checked the charts on the morning of our flight and identified the closest dry land to be a small island well north of Saipan, called Anatahan.
About 45 uneventful minutes later, the jagged outline of Anatahan emerged before us out of the tropical haze.
As we approached the island, we quickly realized why Anatahan never was going to be a popular resort destination.
On the other hand, if no secondaries developed, we were faced with an agonizing choice: Try to land on Anatahan, or fly across 80 miles of open ocean to reach our ship.
Helens, which reawakened in 2004; Hawaii's Kilauea, which has been continuously active since early in 1983; and Anatahan, a volcanic island about 320 kilometers north of Guam that rumbled to life from dormancy in May 2003.
Swarms of seismic activity from the Anatahan volcano located on an uninhabited island started early on 31 March 2004, according to the US Geological Survey.
As with most cliches, there is some truth to the stereotype, as demonstrated by Jacques Rivette's review, in Arts, of Anatahan (1953).
While the resulting affirmations can occasionally seem absurd (especially in retrospect-thus, Anatahan is not only the crowning achievement of Sternberg's oeuvre, but also "the greatest Japanese film"
In field trials last June, the scientists went to Anatahan, a small volcanic island about 300 km north of Guam.
During the June tests, he and his colleagues scanned the still-erupting Anatahan from a ship, a helicopter, and the island itself.