Anaximenes


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Related to Anaximenes: Anaximander, Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Heraclitus

Anaximenes

(ăn'əksĭm`ĭnēz), Greek philosopher, 6th cent. B.C., last of the Milesian school founded by ThalesThales
, c.636–c.546 B.C., pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of Miletus and reputed founder of the Milesian school of philosophy. He is the first recorded Western philosopher. Thales taught that everything in nature is composed of one basic stuff, which he thought to be water.
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. With Thales he held that a single element lay behind the diversity of nature, and with AnaximanderAnaximander
, c.611–c.547 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Miletus; pupil of Thales. He made the first attempt to offer a detailed explanation of all aspects of nature.
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 he sought a principle to account for diversity. He believed that single element to be air. The principle of diversification he taught was rarefaction and condensation. Different objects were therefore merely different degrees of density of the one basic element. Anaximenes anticipates the spirit of modern scientific practice that seeks to explain qualitative differences quantitatively.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the poem never can simply float on air and present its own being as the felted earth does in Anaximenes.
Anaximander's student Anaximenes viewed the heavenly bodies, or at least the sun and moon, as thin flat disks floating on the air like leaves.
The author then moves on to a detailed discussion of the lives and contributions of the pre-Socratic natural philosophers Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes and many subsequent citizens and residents of Miletus who brought fame to the ancient city during some of the region's most famous conflicts involving Persia, Sparta, Macedonia, Egypt and Syria.
Whether or not Anaximander developed some of his doctrines in reaction to those of Thales, and Anaximenes to those of Anaximander, with later philosophers we have texts in which they refer unmistakably to the theories of their predecessors, often mentioning them by name.
Whereas for Thales ultimate reality was water; for Heraclitus, fire; and for Anaximenes it was air; Empedocles rejected all these notions and insisted that reality consisted of four elements: earth, water, air, and fire.
Others, such as Thales, Anaximander, and Anaximenes, proposed that everything was essentially composed of one universal thing or substance; water, aperion, or air, respectively (Jaspers, 1966).
He also attributes to Hippocrates the original depiction of the theory of the four primordial elements: earth, air, fire, and water, when, in fact, Anaximenes and Heraclitus spoke of this concept more than a century earlier.
the theories of Thales, Anaximenes and Heraclitus).
Presocratics like Thales and Anaximenes thought they had caught sight of an underlying unity and ultimate causal ground in the matter of things.
argumentieren, doch im Falle des Bruchstucks PErl 7, bei dem es sich um den Rest einer Rede des im Roman auftretenden Philosophen Anaximenes handeln konnte (vgl.
For instance, Anaximander recognizes the need for generality in good explanation and anticipates the Principle of Sufficient Reason; Anaximenes uses concrete explanatory analogies; Xenophanes rejects polytheistic causality in favor of that of one Deity; Heraclitus demarcates the world of sense from its underlying explanatory principle (logos); and Alcmaeon, in arguing the soul's immortality, effectively propounds the Principle of Causal Synonymy.
What does it mean and how is it feasible to think through and with Homer, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Parmenides, Heraclitus, and Empedocles, that is, early Greek philosophy and culture, in the wake of, and impelled by, Heidegger's ambitious claim of retrieving the tradition, of embarking on another inception of thinking that takes place otherwise than metaphysics?