Andersonville


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Related to Andersonville: Camp Sumter

Andersonville,

village (1990 pop. 277), SW Ga., near Americus; inc. 1881. In Andersonville Prison, officially known as Camp Sumter, tens of thousands of Union soldiers were confined during the Civil War under conditions so bad that nearly 13,000 soldiers died. Its location is part of Andersonville National Historic Site (495 acres/200 hectares), a national memorial for all American prisoners of war, with a museum dedicated to them. The site also includes Andersonville National Cemetery, which contains more than 15,000 soldiers' graves.

Andersonville

in southwest Georgia; imprisoned Union soldiers died under wretched conditions. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 99]

Andersonville

horrible Civil War prison where 12,926 Union soldiers died. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 18]
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 14 national cemeteries controlled by the National Park Service, two are still active: Andersonville National Cemetery in Georgia and Andrew Johnson National Cemetery in Tennessee.
Hutch is now open for dinner in Andersonville and daily brunch kicks off on Saturday.
Sadly, no one expected the hellish prisoner-of-war camps such as Andersonville and Douglas.
Like all the Pastoral stores from their onset, the Andersonville shop, which opened on Oct.
Concluding the book are a roster of the cavalry, causes of death, general courts-martial for its members, a list of those held at Andersonville Prison, and a list of officers mustered out of Florida.
Cramped into an Andersonville prison, a Confederate prison of war camp in Georgia, soldiers become cutthroats nearly criminally insane in their attempts to stay alive.
Camp Sumter Military Prison, known as Andersonville, opened in the early part of 1864 after United States and Confederate authorities failed to reach an agreement regarding the fate of captured black soldiers, and all prisoner exchanges were halted.
Definitely come in June, for Andersonville Midsommarfest.
Camp Randall was also a prison for confederates, who were treated much better than the unfortunate Wisconsin soldiers captured and sent to the notorious Libby Prison in Virginia and Andersonville in Georgia.
In 1867, Fanny Fern rides with a boat-man who had been imprisoned in the Andersonville POW camp, and his lack of bitterness overcomes her.
Using memoirs, diaries, and letters, as well as official documents, Futch paints a vivid picture of life in Georgia's Andersonville Prison, one of the most notoriously brutal stockades during the Civil War.
Although it only existed for the last fourteen months of the Civil War, Andersonville became legendary for its appalling conditions documented in the diaries of its prisoners and the trail transcripts of its commandant.