Andersonville National Historic Site

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Andersonville National Historic Site

Address:496 Cemetery Rd
Andersonville, GA 31711

Phone:229-924-0343
Fax:229-928-9640
Web: www.nps.gov/ande/
Size: 515 acres.
Established: Authorized on October 16, 1970.
Location:10 miles north of Americus, Georgia, on GA 49.
Facilities:Picnic area, rest rooms (é), visitor center (é), museum/exhibit, self-guided tour/trail, primitive campsite (available at no charge to educational and scout groups).
Activities:Guided tour, audio driving tour.
Special Features:Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest of many Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. During the 14 months of its existence (1864-1865), more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here, of which nearly 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding, or exposure to the elements. Today, Andersonville is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. The park also features the National Prisoners of War Museum and Andersonville National Cemetery.

See other parks in Georgia.
References in classic literature ?
The carpenter had once been a prisoner in Andersonville prison and had lost a brother.
Andersonville prison ran out of resources in 1865--especially food and medicine--along with the rest of the Confederate army, and had an atrocious death rate among prisoners of 10 percent per month.
Polly mourns the death of her father, endures Andersonville Prison, and narrowly escapes the Sultana steamboat disaster.
In 1864, the first Union prisoners arrived at the Confederates' Andersonville prison camp in Georgia.
Cramped into an Andersonville prison, a Confederate prison of war camp in Georgia, soldiers become cutthroats nearly criminally insane in their attempts to stay alive.
Using memoirs, diaries, and letters, as well as official documents, Futch paints a vivid picture of life in Georgia's Andersonville Prison, one of the most notoriously brutal stockades during the Civil War.
Past research on self-governance in a prison environment examined the Andersonville prison camp that operated in Georgia during the War Between the States and concluded that such an institutional setting was likely to produce a dominant predatory group (Hogarty [1972] 2006).
CPT Wirz was not the first officer to take charge of the Andersonville prison, nor was he solely responsible for the lack of funds, resources, or personnel to run the facility.
While the rest of "Duty and Honor" accurately portrays Michael's experiences as a soldier, including fighting on the battlefield, being an aide in Washington to a senator, and spending time in the horrific Andersonville prison, the book has no real plot to keep the reader turning the page.
In 1864, during the US Civil War, Andersonville prison counted 3000 scurvy deaths among 30 000 prisoners (1).
Focusing keenly on the lives of Americans connected to Andersonville prison before and during the Civil War, Ghosts and Shadows of Andersonville does not minimize or excuse the starvation, mistreatment, and fatalities of the prison but simultaneously counters accusations of deliberate extermination with evidence that the prison also served as a hospital, and that the guards suffered from malnutrition and starvation as surely as the prisoners.
Clara Barton identified bodies at Andersonville Prison after the Civil War, and it is thought that she was responsible for planting these trees.