Andocides


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Andocides

(ăndŏs`ĭdēz), c.440–390 B.C., one of the Ten Attic Orators (see oratoryoratory,
the art of swaying an audience by eloquent speech. In ancient Greece and Rome oratory was included under the term rhetoric, which meant the art of composing as well as delivering a speech.
..... Click the link for more information.
). In 415 B.C. he was accused of mutilating the hermae (sacred pillars topped by busts of the gods) and, in association with AlcibiadesAlcibiades
, c.450–404 B.C., Athenian statesman and general. Of the family of Alcmaeonidae, he was a ward of Pericles and was for many years a devoted attendant of Socrates. He turned to politics after the Peace of Nicias (421 B.C.
..... Click the link for more information.
, of other sacrilege. He went into exile, and one of his speeches was a plea to be restored to citizenship. After he returned in 403, he was again accused (399) of sacrilege and again successfully defended himself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Katz (1976:373-4) emphasises the prominence of Peisandros as a radical democrat: '[I]n the context of spring, 414, ridicule of Peisander was politically significant, for, as Andocides, On the Mysteries 27 and 36 informs us, Peisander acted as a [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.
The final chapter looks at the impiety trials of Andocides, Nichomachus, and Socrates, and at the restoration of democracy after the terror of The Thirty.
historiography: Thucydides, Theopompus and Xenophon; oratory: Aeschines, Andocides, Antiphon, Demades, Demosthenes, Hyperides, Isaeus, Isocrates, Lysias, Lycurgus; philosophical prose: Aristotle, Plato and Xenophon; technical treatises: Aristotle and Xenophon.
In Ajax and Philoctetes, for example, Odysseus represents Andocides, but in Euripides' Cyclops he represents Alcibiades, which would not have posed a problem because "the careers of Andocides and Alcibiades since 415 .
of][omega] is to "serve public office and one's own cost"; see Andocides 1.
Part five, which is on Oratory, consists of essays on Antiphon, Andocides, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes and Aeschines.
This volume presents both extracts and full speeches (in the original Greek) from the first five of the ancient canon of Attic orators: Antiphon, Andocides, Lysias, Isocrates, and Isaeus.
1; Henry Blumenthal, "Meletus the Accuser of Andocides and Meletus the Accuser of Socrates: One Man or Two?
The chapter on rhetoric has important implications for how one thinks about the use of Athenian history in the likes of Andocides, or Aelius Aristides.
89) So notably in Andocides, On the Mysteries, 73-6.