Andokides


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Andokides

 

potter and possibly vase painter who lived during the second half of the sixth century B.C.

Andocides worked in Athens, and his name is connected with the transition from the black-figure to the red-figure technique of vase painting. Among the vases which have been preserved are black-figure vases, such as the amphora from Andocides’ workshop entitled Heracles and Cerberus, located in the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow, and red-figure vases, such as the amphora with a citharist, in the Louvre, Paris. There are also several vases executed in both techniques, such as the amphora entitled The Feasting Heracles, in the Museum of Classical Minor Art, Munich, and a kylix in the National Museum, Palermo.

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That Kleonymos proposed a reward of one thousand drachmas for information about the desecration of the Hermai and the profanation of the Mysteries (Katz 1976:375), is neither mentioned nor implied in Birds, but is information derived from Andokides, On the mysteries 27.
A rare depiction comes from a late Archaic red-figure amphora by the Andokides Painter (Figure 2).
This uncertainty extends to the identification of the women on the Andokides vase as well.
92) In that year the whole issue of the profaning of the mysteries in 416 was reopened by the trial of Andokides and led to a frenzy of religious enthusiasm and persecution, an atmosphere conducive to the eventual accusation and trial of Socrates later that year.