Michaux, André

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Michaux, André

(äNdrā` mēshō`), 1746–1802, French botanist. He collected botanical specimens in Europe and Asia. In 1785 he was sent by the French government to establish nurseries in the United States to cultivate plants for naturalization in France. Until 1796 he made botanical journeys through the United States and recorded his studies in a book on the oaks of North America (1801) and in a work on North American botany, Flora Boreali-Americana (1803). His son, François André Michaux, 1770–1855, is known chiefly for his work on the forest trees of North America (1810–13, tr. The North American Sylva, 1817).
References in periodicals archive ?
It is believed that the camellia sinensis plant first arrived on North American soil in 1799 by French botanist, Francois Andre Michaux, near Charleston, South Carolina at Middleton Barony.
The forest is named for the French botanist, Andre Michaux, who discovered and named many plants in the 18th century.
in the 18th century by Andre Michaux as part of a nursery established in Charleston, South Carolina (Cothran 2004).
The Proceedings of the Andre Michaux International Symposium.
The French explorer and botanist, Andre Michaux, who came to America in search of new plants, named the tree for a fellow Frenchman, Pierre Magnol, who was director of the Botanic Gardens in Montpelier, France.
He got the American Philosophical Society to support an expedition led by the famous French explorer and botanist Andre Michaux that would cross the continent to the Pacific and back.
In his North America Sylva (1857), Francois Andre Michaux tells at length about the medicinal virtues of sassafras and reports that they prompted early planting of the tree in Europe.
In fact, the French botanist Andre Michaux had visited the same vicinity in 1794 and described it as "very barren.
Even Andre Michaux, the botanist who named the tree after Table Mountain in North Carolina, where he first encountered it, found little to boast about in this species.
Over millions of years they've developed the unique characteristics we know today, allowing botanists Carolus Linnaeus to develop the nomenclature system and Andre Michaux to articulate the place in the nomenclature for North American trees.