Andrewes


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Andrewes

Lancelot. 1555--1626, English bishop and theologian
References in periodicals archive ?
65) On troop-carriers and whether they were a special type of ship or just an undermanned trireme, see Gomme, Andrewes & Dover 1970:309, 487; Wallinga 1993:175, who in discussing this passage concludes that 'stratiotis had as much the meaning "trireme with minimal crew" as that of "transport"'; Hornblower 2008:1061-66.
Then we're in Yorkshire in 1586, and the young Lancelot Andrewes, as the Queen's Chaplain, is visiting a church where there are suggestions the faithful have still not given up their "Pope-ish" ways.
Kurt Vonnegut, in his autobiographical novel Timequake (1997), called Andrewes "the greatest writer in the English language" and credited him with translating the Twenty-third Psalm.
Somebody in Huddersfield must know something about the Tweedales or the Andrewes of Almondbury," he said.
But just when the Puritan triumph seemed complete, there emerged in the last decade of Elizabeth's reign an 'avant-garde' of clergy, led by Richard Hooker and Lancelot Andrewes, 'committed not just to greater ceremonialism in worship but who increasingly questioned what passed for [Calvinist] doctrinal orthodoxy' (p.
First isolated in 1933 by Laidlaw, Andrewes and Smith (1) and one of the first human viruses to be isolated, it has been intensively studied in the minutest of details over many decades.
But there is far more to Andrewes than that, a depth and a delicacy beyond the sometimes violent polarizations of the age.
First she uses the writings of Lancelot Andrewes and Andrew Willet against Bellarmine to demonstrate the change in the political debate from the sixteenth to the seventeenth century as both the cardinal and the king championed the control of the jurisdiction of bodies through the jurisdiction of souls or consciences.
was also recorded by Andrewes (1929) from several localities in 'British India', but some of these records for guineensis are doubtful, especially those from Assam and Poona.
Brydon finds that during the reigns of James I and Charles I, Calvinists disagreed as to whether Hooker was one of them or not, although Roman Catholics maintained that he had made enough concessions to Rome that he had undermined Protestantism; meanwhile "avant-garde conformists" such as Lancelot Andrewes and, especially, William Laud used Hooker to rebut Puritan criticisms of the Established Church and to develop a theological perspective distinct from Calvinism.
This clerical initiative was inspired by the example of the royal chapel and the arrangements in the private chapel of Bishop Lancelot Andrewes, bishop of Winchester and dean of the Chapel Royal, 1618-1626, and mentor to both Laud and Neile.
Chronologically some of them pre-date Archbishop Laud's rise to power and are closely linked with earlier figures such as Lancelot Andrewes and Richard Hooker.