Andric, Ivo

Andrić, Ivo

(ē`vō än`drĭch), 1892–1975, Yugoslav novelist and poet, b. Bosnia. As a student Andrić worked for the independence and unity of the South Slavic peoples, and after the formation in 1918 of the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (later Yugoslavia), he served in diplomatic posts. His best-known work is a historical trilogy (1945) on Bosnia: The Bridge on the Drina (tr. 1959), Bosnian Story (tr. 1959), and Young Miss. Andrić's other works include poems and novellas. The misery of man's struggle for existence is his principal theme. Andrić was awarded the 1961 Nobel Prize in Literature. His later stories and novellas include Devil's Yard (1954, tr. 1962), Faces (1960), Vizier's Elephant (tr. 1962), cited in the Nobel Prize presentation, and The Pasha's Concubine (tr. 1968).

Andrić, Ivo

 

Born Oct. 10, 1892, in Travnik, Bosnia. Serbian writer. Born into a family of artisans.

For participating in the national liberation movement, Andrič was arrested by the Austro-Hungarian authorities and interned in 1914. He had already begun to publish in 1911. In continuing the realistic traditions of Serbian literature in his novellas of the I920’s and 1930’s, Andrić depicted man’s inner world, which is subjected to national and social contradictions. The best novels of Andrić are Bridge on the Drina (1945) and Bosnian Chronicle (1945), both devoted to the history of Bosnia. Andrić’s works are profoundly philosophical and also possess psychological depth. He is the author of literary criticism on P. Njegoŝ, V. Karadzic, the artist F. Goya, and others. Andrić won a Nobel Prize in 1961.

WORKS

Sabrana dela. vols. 1–10. Belgrade, 1964.
In Russian translation:
Most na Drine. Moscow, 1956.
Izbrannoe. Moscow, 1957.
Travnitskaia khronika. Moscow, 1958.
Prokliatyi dvor: Povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1967.

REFERENCES

Džadžić , P. Ivo Andrić: Esej. Belgrade, 1957.
Ivo Andrić. Belgrade, 1962.