Andronovo Culture

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Andronovo Culture

 

an archaeological culture from the Bronze Age. It was identified in the 1920’s by S. A. Teploukhov and is named after the village of Andronovo, near Achinsk. The Andronovo culture is regarded as a conventional term for a community of partially related cultures that were spread over the territory of Kazakhstan, western Siberia, and the southern Urals. In the west it came into contact with a culture characterized by the use of notched logs in construction. There is no unanimity of opinion among researchers regarding the boundaries of the territory and the basic features common to this community of local cultures. Neither is there agreement on the question of the exact time when this culture existed. It is dated approximately in the middle and the second half of the second millennium B.C. Artifacts from the cultures of the Andronovo community are represented in settlements of various kinds (with remnants of semisubterranean and ground-level dwellings) and by burial grounds (with graves, more rarely with cremation sites). The burial sites are often marked by round low embankments and sometimes by stone barriers. At the burial sites the following kinds of items have been found: flint arrowheads, bronze tools and weapons, beads of copper and paste, and belled gold and copper earrings. The ceramics are flat-bottomed, as a rule, and consist of ornamented pots, jars, and rectangular “dishes.”

REFERENCES

Teploukhov, S. A. “Opyt klassifikatsii drevnikh metallicheskikh kul’tur Minusinskogo kraia.” In the collection Materialy po etnografii, vol. 4, issue 2. Department of Ethnography of the Russian State Museum. Leningrad, 1929.
Kiselev, S. V. Drevniaia istoriia Iuzhnoi Sibiri. Moscow-Leningrad, 1949.
Chernikov, S. S. Vostochnyi Kazakhstan ν epokhu bronzy. Moscow, 1960.
Sal’nikov, K. V. Ocherki drevnei istorii Iuzhnogo Urala. Moscow, 1967.
Istoriia Sibiri s drevneishikh vremen do nashikh dnei, vol. 1. Leningrad, 1968.
References in periodicals archive ?
A skeleton from the Unetice culture in Poland dates to more than 4,000 years ago, and one from Siberia's Andronovo culture is about 3,700 years old.
Sample 9 shows a denser balanced plain-woven cloth with a wider, ribbon-like yarn (Figure 4c), that resembles slightly earlier textile-impressed pottery from Sintashta and Andronovo period cemeteries in southern Russia (Orfinskaya et al.
Fussman provides a balanced assessment of the prospects of finding any clear-cut markers that would point specifically to Indo-Iranians, Iranians, or Indo-Aryans within the area of the Andronovo culture east of the Caspian Sea down through Bactria, Margiana, and the Indus Valley, the likely route taken by the Indians and Iranians into their current homes.
A review of the literature concerning the uses of pottery in the Andronovo culture and in the area north of the Black Sea by the Scythians is presented by V.
186), and Mallory and Mair 2000: 127-31, 252-69, and passim (with a good summary of the latest views on the Andronovo and Afanasevo Cultures and the Bactria-Margiana Archaeological Complex).
The next major phase of the Bronze Age in the Kazakh steppes falls under the general umbrella of the Andronovo cultures, including the Alakul and Fyodorovo subcultures (Yevdokimov & Varfolomeev 2002; Koryakova & Epimakhov 2007).
The first homeland of the Turks was in the broad region north of China, the so-called Andronovo cultural area.
De l'age du bronze a l'Age du fer au Kazakhstan, gestes funeraires et parametres biologiques: identites culturelles des populations Andronovo et Saka (Memoires de la Mission archeologique francaise en Asie centrale 12).
A crucial element of the latter is the interpretation of the Andronovo archaeological culture (family of cultures, or cultural intercommunity), whose sites lie within a huge territory behind the Urals.
Archeologie de la mort, necropoles, gestes funeaires et anthropologie des populations Andronovo et Saka de l'age du Bronze a l'age du Fer au Kazakhstan ([II.
De l'age du bronze a rage du fer au Kazakhstan, gestes funeraires et parametres biologiques: identites culturelles des populations Andronovo et Saka (Memoires de la Mission archeologique francaise en Asie centrale 12).
The period of development for the Srubnaya and Andronovo cultures, representing the Late Bronze Age, is well represented by the investigation of numerous archaeological sites (Figure 2: III).