declination

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Related to Angle of declination: angle of dip

declination,

in astronomy, one of the coordinates in the equatorial coordinate systemequatorial coordinate system,
the most commonly used astronomical coordinate system for indicating the positions of stars or other celestial objects on the celestial sphere. The celestial sphere is an imaginary sphere with the observer at its center.
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. The declination of a celestial body is its angular distance north or south of the celestial equator measured along its hour circlehour circle,
in astronomy, a secondary axis in the equatorial coordinate system. The hour circle of a celestial body is the great circle on the celestial sphere that passes through both the body and the north celestial pole.
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declination

(dek-lă-nay -shŏn) (dec) Symbol: δ. A coordinate used with right ascension in the equatorial coordinate system. The declination of a celestial body, etc., is its angular distance (from 0° to 90°) north (counted positive) or south (counted negative) of the celestial equator. It is measured along the hour circle passing through the body.

Declination

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

The solar system lies more or less in one geometric plane, which is why astrological charts can be drawn in two dimensions. If the celestial equator (which is the terrestrial equator extended out into space, and projected against the background of the stars) is used as a point of reference, it is found that, at any given time, most celestial bodies do not lie exactly in the same plane, but, rather, are located somewhat north or south of the celestial equator. The angular distance (distance expressed in degrees and minutes) of these bodies north or south of the celestial equator is their declination. Because some astrologers regard planets at the same declination as being in aspect with one another, planets’ declinations are often recorded in ephemerides.

declination

[‚dek·lə′nā·shən]
(astronomy)
The angular distance of a celestial object north or south of the celestial equator.
(geophysics)
The angle between the magnetic and geographical meridians, expressed in degrees and minutes east or west to indicate the direction of magnetic north from true north. Also known as magnetic declination; variation.
(navigation)
In a system of polar or spherical coordinates, the angle at the origin between a line to a point and the equatorial plane, measured in a plane perpendicular to the equatorial plane.
The arc between the equator and the point measured on a great circle perpendicular to the equator.

declination

declination
declinationclick for a larger image
i. The angular difference in direction between magnetic north and true north, or between grid north and true north; hence, magnetic declination and grid declination.
ii. The angular distance of a celestial body from the celestial equator along the hour circle of the body. Measured in degrees, or radians, through 90°, and named north or south, depending on whether the body is north or south of the celestial equator. Declination on the celestial sphere is analogous to the latitude of the earth. The value of declination cannot exceed 90°.

declination

1. Astronomy the angular distance, esp in degrees, of a star, planet, etc., from the celestial equator measured north (positive) or south (negative) along the great circle passing through the celestial poles and the body