Casablanca Conference

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Casablanca Conference,

Jan. 14–24, 1943, World War II meeting of U.S. President Franklin Delano RooseveltRoosevelt, Franklin Delano
, 1882–1945, 32d President of the United States (1933–45), b. Hyde Park, N.Y. Early Life

Through both his father, James Roosevelt, and his mother, Sara Delano Roosevelt, he came of old, wealthy families.
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 and British Prime Minister Winston ChurchillChurchill, Sir Winston Leonard Spencer,
1874–1965, British statesman, soldier, and author; son of Lord Randolph Churchill. Early Career

Educated at Harrow and Sandhurst, he became (1894) an officer in the 4th hussars.
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 at Casablanca, French Morocco. A joint declaration pledged that the war would end only with the unconditional surrender of the Axis states. No agreement was reached on the claims for leadership of the rival French generals, Henri H. GiraudGiraud, Henri Honoré
, 1879–1949, French general. He served in World War I and in the campaign in Morocco (1925–26). A commander in World War II, he was captured by the Germans in May, 1940, but made a dramatic escape (1942) to unoccupied France and from there
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 and Charles de Gaullede Gaulle, Charles
, 1890–1970, French general and statesman, first president (1959–69) of the Fifth Republic. The World Wars

During World War I de Gaulle served with distinction until his capture in 1916. In The Army of the Future (1934, tr.
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, who also attended the conference.
References in periodicals archive ?
The frequent Anglo-American summit conferences, for example, were invariably deemed successful by the participants but were often used to moderate ill-feeling caused by problems in the relationship.
On August 15 1943, at Quadrant, the Anglo-American summit conference in Quebec City, Operation OVERLORD, the final plan for the invasion of Europe, was accepted by the Combined Chiefs of Staff.
Australian prime minister John Howard declined an invitation to join the Anglo-American summit in Camp David.

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