Anglo-Norman


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Anglo-Norman

History
1. relating to the Norman conquerors of England, their society, or their language
2. a Norman inhabitant of England after 1066
3. the Anglo-French language
References in periodicals archive ?
The Anglo-Norman perspective at Lisbon was revealed in an extended letter that has come to be known as De expugnatione Lyxbonensi [The Conquest of Lisbon].
We can draw the following comparisons between Eleanor Hull's Middle English text and the presumed Anglo-Norman original.
Colfer's closing argument is a timely discussion of the use of the term Norman and Anglo-Norman to describe the settlers who arrived in Ireland in the high and late medieval periods.
In "'Pur les francs homes amender': Clerical Authors and the Thirteenth-Century Context of Historical Romance," Rosalind Field turns attention away from the glamorous baronial patrons of the Anglo-Norman historical romances to the sometimes disparaged clerical authors to show what interests were being served by them.
After reading (for example) its stereotyped account of Anglo-Normans in Ireland, one may even warm to Seamus Heaney's remark, 'Not all empires are bad'.
JUST seven years after the appearance of Judith Weiss's edition and translation of Le Roman de Brut, the Jerseyman Wace's Anglo-Norman adaptation of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Britanniae, we have a translation by Arthur Wayne Glowka, Le Roman de Brut: The French Book of Brutus, published in 2005 under the aegis of the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.
And Robert the Bruce, the man Wallace was so desperate to see on the throne of Scotland, was in fact an Englishman of Anglo-Norman stock.
The language all around him was that of the streets a 'rich polyglot mixture of Latin patois, Anglo-Norman phraseology and English demotic' all of which Chaucer absorbed, cultivated and later moulded into his dazzlingly original poems.
Bartlett's edition is satisfactory, but the reader cannot help feeling disappointed that he did not go into more detail in discussing the transmission of the work, including the Anglo-Norman version of the Life (mentioned but not discussed here).
2002 is the 600th anniversary of the success of Owain Glyndwr of freeing the walled towns of Wales, such as Cardiff, from Anglo-Norman domination, " the Plaid AM told colleagues.
Its section on `Essays and Studies' contains sixteen articles that open with Bruce Metzger's presidential address on `Some Curious Bibles' and range from Jerome McGann on the rationale of hypertext and Deirdre Phillips on the text in the development of literary sociology to studies of texts in literature, art and music from the Anglo-Norman to modern-day periods.
He also seems to imply that only by having an infusion of Anglo-Norman blood can a Welsh person be seen to be in any way having an "international" perspective.