ethnocentrism

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ethnocentrism,

the feeling that one's group has a mode of living, values, and patterns of adaptation that are superior to those of other groups. It is coupled with a generalized contempt for members of other groups. Ethnocentrism may manifest itself in attitudes of superiority or sometimes hostility. Violence, discrimination, proselytizing, and verbal aggressiveness are other means whereby ethnocentrism may be expressed.

ethnocentrism

  1. the attitude of prejudice or mistrust towards outsiders which may exist within a social group; a way of perceiving one's own cultural group (in-group) in relation to others (out-groups). The term was introduced by W. G. SUMNER (1906) and involves the belief that one's own group is the most important, or is culturally superior to other groups. Thus, one's own culture is considered to be racially, morally and culturally of greater value or significance than that of others, and one becomes distrustful of those defined as outsiders. It also involves an incapacity to acknowledge that cultural differentiation does not imply the inferiority of those groups who are ethnically distinct from one's own.
  2. a characteristic of certain personality types. The ethnocentric personality is described by T Adorno et al. (1950) in The Authoritarian Personality (see AUTHORITARIAN PERSONALITY). Initially this study was concerned with the social and psychological aspects of anti-Semitism, but developed into a study of its more general correlates. Adorno et al. were concerned with explaining attitudes towards other ‘out-groups’ in American society, such as homosexuals and ethnic minorities, and maintained that antagonism towards one ‘out-group’ (e.g. Jews) seldom existed in isolation. They found that ethnocentrism tended to be associated with authoritarianism, dogmatism and rigidity, political and economic conservatism, and an implicit anti-democratic ideology. Thus, hostility towards one ‘out-group’ (see IN-GROUP AND OUT-GROUP) was often generalized and projected onto other ‘out-groups’. See also PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM OR RACIALISM, ATTITUDE, ATTITUDE SCALE.
References in periodicals archive ?
129) The apparent deference, of both the court of first instance and the appellate court, to Georgatsoulis's Greek culture belies any allegation of Anglocentrism.
Within the United Church itself, tolerance of diversity in culture and religion replaced the Anglocentrism which characterized nineteenth century evangelical missions.
Yet the traditional terms used to describe the conflict which engulfed Britain and Ireland during the 1640s, which include `Puritan Revolution', `English Revolution', and more recently `British Civil War(s)', tend to perpetuate this anglocentrism.
10) The Anglocentrism of the `old' British history deflected attention from the history of Scotland, Ireland and Wales; however, the exclusively archipelagic focus of the new British history may enshrine a more expansive, but no less insular, form of provincialism unless it `extends itself into oceanic, American, and global dimensions', like the British historical experience itself.
Finally, no matter how hard I tried to resist my Anglocentrism, my favorite event came from the UK in the form of a sonorous new play by Philip Osment titled Flesh and Blood.
The genial omissions and false details our texts use to retail the Pilgrim legend promote Anglocentrism, which only handicaps us when dealing with all those whose culture is not Anglo.
Reviewing the centennial Carcanet editions of Hugh MacDiarmid's Selected Poetry and Selected Prose in The Dominion Sunday Times, Vincent O'Sullivan wrote that the neglect of this major poet internationally in university curricula was primarily due to the rampant Anglocentrism of university lecturers) The 'crisis in English studies' which has taken place over the last twenty years or so has corresponded with the theoretical deconstruction of the bases of 'English' literary studies, and this has been contemporary with the development of increasingly informed readings of 'Post-colonial Literatures in English'.
He simply does not conform to the assumptions of most of those who have sought to narrate the course of politics in post-Reformation England, and certainly not those self-styled revisionists who have, for reasons that frequently remain unclear, clung to a weird kind of anglocentrism in order to argue that we can describe the Reformation in England without referring very much to what was happening on the Continent.
The World War II chapter continues this Anglocentrism, choosing Canada, the United States, Great Britain, and Australia as Allied nations to emphasize.
Understanding the reasons behind an existing Anglocentrism in various sectors of the Indian culture, for instance Indian cinema, requires an examination of India's own relations with the colonial past as well as its negotiations with the current surge of white American cultural norms and practices, as they influence and inform the cultural psyche of the nation in this postcolonial moment.
This process, however, is too complicated to be explained simply, as Rushdie suggests, by Anglocentrism on Scott's part; rather, guilt, self-punishment, identification with, and ambiguity toward the lost object all arise as melancholic symptoms in the Raj Quartet by means of what Freud referred to as re-transcription, or nachtraglichkeit (see Khanna 15).
Anglocentrism complimented a more popular and political view of labour history, which existed not as a narrative, but as a template into which the past was to be poured.