Anglo-Saxon

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Anglo-Saxon

1. a member of any of the West Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) that settled in Britain from the 5th century ad and were dominant until the Norman conquest
2. the language of these tribes
References in periodicals archive ?
The finding raises an intriguing possibility that indigenous people in Britain may have repelled the AngloSaxons but adopted the invaders' language and culture, said Eimear Kenny, a population geneticist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, who was not involved in the work.
But this glittering array is just part of a vast hoard of AngloSaxon gold and silver found in a field by a man with a metal detector.
While the North Atlantic world relied much more on European migrations (Baylin 2005: 34), the idea of the black Atlantic was built with the AngloSaxon world as a reference.
They go on to give a list of 11 ethnic groups that members must fall into, ranging from "the AngloSaxon folk community" to the "Celtic-Norse folk community".
evident in sense of Relative degree AngloSaxon collegiality, of insulation world.
Dafoe, "The Day of the AngloSaxon," Manitoba Free Press, 16 June 1906.
La huella de Cervantes y del Quijote en la cultura anglosajona / Cervantes's and Don Quixote's Imprint in AngloSaxon Culture, Universidad de Valladolid & Centro Buendia (Valladolid), 597.
The English poet Geoffrey Hill in his Mereian Hymns addresses the eighth-century AngloSaxon ruler Offa as 'King of the perennial holly groves, the riven sandstone: overlord of the MS'.
Adebajo raises the controversial issue of whether Annan, the choice of AngloSaxon powers, was really "African enough" to serve the South, as other Africans have suggested.
Petersmann indeed asserts that he considers economic and social rights equally as important as civil and political rights, a view which he contrasts with that held in the USA or the AngloSaxon world (Petersmann, E, 2005, p 69).
The role with which they [darky entertainers] are identified is not, despite its "blackness," Negro American (indeed, Negroes are repelled by it); it does not find its popularity among Negroes but among whites; and although it resembles the role of the clown familiar to Negro variety-house audiences, it derives not from the Negro but from the AngloSaxon branch of American folklore.
Indeed the only wise thing Baros did was reveal he hid from Stubbs after the game, an action that may only rubber-stamp the Everton captain's AngloSaxon opinion of the striker.