factory farming

(redirected from Animal feeding operations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

factory farming

[′fak·trē ‚fär·miŋ]
(agriculture)
Raising livestock indoors under conditions of extremely restricted mobility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on the results of the case studies, it is quite apparent that significant externalities are associated with animal feeding operations, that the relationship between externalities, farm characteristics, and community attributes can be quite complex, and that negative impacts of animal facilities, as reflected in lowered property values, can extend beyond established setbacks.
School proximity to concentrated animal feeding operations and prevalence of asthma in students.
Animal Feeding Operations (AFO) and Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) [website].
Those who manage these so-called confined animal feeding operations are appropriately called "operators.
Since 2002, at least 68 government-sponsored or peer-reviewed studies have been completed that examined air and water quality issues associated with animal feeding operations and 15 have directly linked air and water pollutants from animal waste to specific health or environmental impacts.
Water pollution from animal feeding operations has been a topic of
Topics examined include cruise ship pollution, MTBE in gasoline, EPA regulation of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), and EPA's response to the Waterkeeper Alliance court decision on regulation of CAFOs.
Air and water pollution from Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) is reduced to such low levels that high-density livestock operations can now be constructed on a scale large enough (50,000+ head) to efficiently integrate them with biofuel/ethanol production in a manner that is environmentally sustainable (Integrated Projects).
9 million grant to provide technical assistance to livestock operators, including animal feeding operations, for the prevention of water discharges and reduction of air emissions.
The largest 5 percent of these farm factories are called "concentrated animal feeding operations," or CAFOs.
Nevertheless, Worldwatch blames the rise in industrial animal operations and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs)--along with high population densities and weak public health, occupational and environmental standards--for many of the animal health-related ills of the world.