Ankylosaur

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Ankylosaur

 

armored dinosaur, suborder of the Ornithi-schia order of dinosaurs, characteristic of the Cretaceous period. Ankylosaurs were large (up to eight or nine meters long), herbivorous, four-legged reptiles. The body was broad and thick, protected from above by bony spines or shields that were joined in some ankylosaurs into a solid coat of armor, hence their other name. There were often sharp spikes at the end of the tail, which served as an active means of defense against predatory dinosaurs. Remains of ankylosaurs have been found on all the continents except Australia and Antarctica, but mainly in the Cretaceous layer of North America, Europe, and Asia. In the USSR they have been found in Central Kazakhstan and Kyzylkum.

REFERENCE

Osnovy paleontologii. Vol. 12: Zemnovodnye, presmykaiushchiesia i ptitsy. Moscow, 1964.

A. K. ROZHDESTVENSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
James Kirkland, incoming Utah State paleontologist and expert on ankylosaurs.
Remains of the ankylosaurs were first found near Price, Utah by Sue Anne Bilby and Evan Hall of the Vernal Field House Museum in Vernal, Utah.
The four species span a period of about 10 million years and Arbour's research shows that three of those ankylosaurs species lived at the same time in what is now Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta.
Victoria Arbour visited dinosaur fossil collections from Alberta to the UK, examining skull armour and comparing those head details with other features of the fossilized ankylosaur, a family of squat, armour plated, plant eaters, remains.
Canadian Club," an ankylosaur, took 36 percent of the votes cast.
Amateur and professional paleontologists on a dig in Colorado last summer found the specimen in 142-million-year-old rocks from the late Jurassic period, making it the oldest known ankylosaur in North America, says excavation leader James Kirkland, who announced the discovery this week.