Anne Frank

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Frank, Anne,

1929–45, German diarist, b. Frankfurt as Anneliese Marie Frank. In order to escape Nazi persecution, her family emigrated (1933) to Amsterdam, where her father Otto became a business owner. After the Nazis occupied the Netherlands, her family (along with several other Jews) hid for just over two years (1942–44) in a "secret annex" that was part of her father's office and warehouse building. During those years, Anne kept a diary characterized by poignancy, insight, humor, touching naiveté, and sometimes tart observation. The family was betrayed to the Germans in 1944, and at 15 Anne died of typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp.

Anne's diary was discovered by one of the family's helpers and after the war was given to her father, the only immediate family member to survive the HolocaustHolocaust
, name given to the period of persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany. Romani (Gypsies), homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, the disabled, and others were also victims of the Holocaust.
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. Edited by him, The Diary of a Young Girl (1947) became an international best seller and has been translated into English (1952) and 66 other languages. It was also adapted into a play (1955) and a film (1959). A critical edition was published in 1986, and a complete edition, containing almost a third more material, appeared in 1995 on the 50th anniversary of her death. Anne Frank also wrote stories, fables, and essays, which were published in 1959. The Franks' Amsterdam hiding place is now a museum, there is a foundation established by her father, and institutions devoted to her exist in New York, Berlin, London, and other cities.

Bibliography

See biographies by M. Müller (tr. 1998) and C. A. Lee (1999); M. Gies, Anne Frank Remembered (1988); R. Van Der Rol and R. Verhoeven, Anne Frank, Beyond the Diary: A Photographic Remembrance (1995); C. A. Lee, The Hidden Life of Otto Frank (2003); F. Prose, Anne Frank: The Book, the Life, the Afterlife (2009); M. Metselaar and R. van der Rol, Anne Frank: Her Life in Words and Pictures (2010); W. Lindwer, The Last Seven Months of Anne Frank (documentary film, 1988, and book, 1992); J. Blair, dir., Anne Frank Remembered (documentary ilm, 1995).

Frank, Anne

(1929–1945) young Dutch girl found and killed by Nazis after years in hiding. [Dutch Lit.: Diary of Anne Frank]

Frank, Anne

(1929–1945) young Dutch diarist, died in Bergen-Belsen camp during WWII. [Jew. Hist.: Wigoder, 196]
References in periodicals archive ?
But while the Van Gogh, Rijksmuseum and the Ann Frank House are on most visitors' mustsee list, the queues, especially at the Frank House are daunting.
Consider the rich heritage that has been left by Samuel Pepys and James Boswell, hero Captain Scott, politician Alan Clark, the monster Joseph Goebbels, the tragic Ann Frank, the highly erotic Anais Nin and the outrageous "Composing Kenneth Williams.
For pity's sake, would Janis Joplin have been so inane as to suggest Ann Frank would have liked her singing?
We also tackled him over a close party aide, Alexandra Phillips, who used derogatory terms including "spaz" and "spasticated" on Facebook, and made light-hearted comments about starving Africans and persecuted Jewish schoolgirl Ann Frank during WW2.
On that occasion, he denied the Holocaust and said the diary of Ann Frank was a fake.
Visit nearby museums or head for the famous house that hid Ann Frank and her family and friends for two long years during WWII.
It was immediately compared to the diary of Dutch-Jewish teenager Ann Frank.
Rydw i wedi darllen cymaint am ferched o''i chenhedlaeth hi, Ann Frank yw''r enwocaf, dybiwn i.
The reason behind my proposal is what I read about the Ann Frank Centre in the United States: Ann is the famous Jewish girl who hid from the Nazi soldiers in Amsterdam, and who wrote her very touching diaries.
One such recent example was the BBC's recent portrayal of the Ann Frank Diaries.
There have been many tears spilt over the tragic pictures shown on television about the death camps and are still spilt over the tragic death of Ann Frank.
After establishing the tradition of Holocaust films in such expected titles as The Diary of Ann Frank (1959) or the mini-series, Holocaust (1978), the chapters that follow introduce the intersection of genre conventions with Holocaust themes, examining four or five films in depth in each chapter.