Anna Comnena

Anna Comnena

(än`nə kŏmnē`nə), b. 1083, d. after 1148, Byzantine princess and historian; daughter of Emperor Alexius I. She plotted, during and after her father's reign, against her brother, John IIJohn II
(John Comnenus) , 1088–1143, Byzantine emperor (1118–43), son and successor of Alexius I. He was crowned despite the intrigues of his sister, Anna Comnena, and of his mother, Irene.
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, in favor of her husband, Nicephorus Bryennius, whom she wished to rule as emperor. Having failed, she retired to a convent. There she wrote the Alexiad (finished in 1148), one of the outstanding Greek historical works of the Middle Ages. Covering the reign of Alexius I and the First Crusade, it tends to glorify her father and his family; however, Anna's familiarity with public affairs and her access to the imperial archives give her work great value. There is an English translation by E. R. Sewter (1979).

Bibliography

See biography by G. Buckler (1929).

References in periodicals archive ?
Writings by Anna Comnena are representative of the care the sick and disabled received at that time.
This thorough investigation analyses the Byzantine Greek Alexiade of Anna Comnena, making a linguistic and stylistic study of its transformation and translation into vernacular Greek, divesting it of what was perceived as antiquated literary expression.
He is tracking two historical figures, the Byzantine princess Anna Comnena, author of an account of her father's reign and often called the first female historian, and Adhemar, Bishop of Le Puy in France, who led one group of Crusaders.
If you're curious about the lives of such writers as Theri, Auvaiyar, Eudocia, Khansa, Huneberc of Heidenheim, Rabi'a al-'Adawiyya, Yeshe Tsogyal, Murasaki Shikibu, Anna Comnena, Clemence of Barking, Janabai, Laila Akhyaliyya, Perchta of Rozmberk, Laura Cereta, Mirabai, Gaspara Stampa, and Gluckel von Hameln--and other women who wrote before 1700--and would like a taste of their work in translation, OTHER WOMEN'S VOICES is the place to start: http://home.
Helena as a woman depicted in art, the empress Zoe as an imperial wife, and the historian Anna Comnena as a "passionate voice.
Indeed, the Byzantine historian Anna Comnena described him during the 12th century as "the greatest saint in the hierarchy".
His discussion of the First Crusade relies heavily, though with some caution, on Anna Comnena.
Nevertheless, in her endnote, the author (who is an archeology graduate) does not claim it as such; and, stressing the dramatic happenings, wars, and machinations of the times (as recorded by Anna Comnena and other biased chroniclers), she states that she tried to recreate that historical period in the form of fiction.
in complete contrast, Lilie's book on relations between Byzantium and the Crusaders relies almost entirely on chroniclers, including some of the greatest medieval historians like Anna Comnena, William of Tyre and Nicetas Choniates.
Anna Of Brunswick's siblings include Group 3 mile-and-a-half winner Anno Luce, Anna Comnena, dam of the smart Sadlers Wings, and Anna Matrushka, whose progeny include Annaba (by In The Wings), Anne Of Saxony, Pozarica and Godolphin's promising three-year-old Andean.
Lastly, there is a sizable category looking at the sources for women in the crusades, including an excellent defense of Anna Comnena as a historian by Peter Frankopan.
Introducing his comprehensive study of child welfare in the Byzantine empire, the author quotes Anna Comnena on three twelfth-century strategies for the care of orphans: supervision by adult relatives, installment in monasteries, and enrollment in orphanages.