Anselm

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Anselm

Saint. 1033--1109, Italian Benedictine monk; archbishop of Canterbury (1093--1109): one of the founders of scholasticism; author of Cur Deus Homo? (Why did God become Man?). Feast day: Aug. 21
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But, here, in Merton's essays on Anselm another end is dominant; nor is it too strong to suggest all other goals are relative to, or dependent upon, the one Merton proposes here.
Anselm and his group were open to a more tolerant and reasonable dialogue with the Jew as well as the Muslim.
Without abandoning the level of faith, and yet without demanding that the unbeliever place himself on the level of faith, Anselm institutes an intelligent, sympathetic dialogue in which the truth of faith makes itself accessible and highly attractive on the level of reason.
Intelligible joy is regarded by Anselm as one of the characteristic fruits of monastic study and prayer.
This agenda (or lack thereof) for theology and for interreligious dialogue may be found in Anselm when he wrote: "I pray, O God, that I may know You and love You, so that I may rejoice in You" (Pros.
Anselm and the Ontological Argument for God" (audio recording, 10/23/63); "St.
Anselm and His Argument," The American Benedictine Review 17 (March, 1966): 238-262.
It cannot be understood as if Anselm had written solitaria ratione.
Anselm and His Argument" directs the reader's attention to his two main sources: David Knowles, The Evolution of Medieval Thought (London: Longmans, Green & Co.
This is how Merton was able to uphold Barth's interpretation of Anselm as "a real rediscovery of the profound religious dimensions of Anselm's thought" (Merton, "Argument," p.
Anselm assumes his own ground, the ground of strictly theological (we would nowadays say dogmatic) impartiality, to be likewise a ground on which the 'unbeliever' could quite well discuss and would want to discuss.
Anselm and Yves represent, in their own way, exceptions to this overriding power struggle.