Antarctic ozone hole

Antarctic ozone hole

[ant¦ärt·ik ′ō‚zōn ‚hōl]
(meteorology)
In the spring, the depletion of stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic region, typically south of 55° latitude, the formation of the hole is explained by the activation of chlorine and the catalytic destruction of O3, it occurs during September, when the polar regions are sunlit but the air is still cold and isolated from midlatitude air by a strong polar vortex. Also known as ozone hole.
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By 1986 we were able to say that CFCs were probably responsible for the Antarctic ozone hole.
NASA's media briefings during the meeting will feature topics such as the latest discoveries from Mars and Saturn's moon Titan, prospects for the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, Comet ISON, and close-up views of the sun from a NASA spacecraft launched this year.
Washington, Oct 22 (ANI): The Antarctic ozone hole, which yawns wide every Southern Hemisphere spring, reached its annual peak on Sept.
First spotted in 1985, the Antarctic ozone hole was quickly linked to chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons, emitted mainly in the Northern Hemisphere but concentrated over the South Pole by atmospheric circulation.
The hexagonal jet stream is acting like a barrier, which results in something like Earth's Antarctic ozone hole.
The Antarctic ozone hole forms when extremely cold conditions, common in the winter Antarctic stratosphere, trigger reactions that convert atmospheric chlorine from human-produced chemicals into forms that destroy ozone.
The Antarctic ozone hole reached record dimensions (154: 246).
For images of the 2013 Antarctic ozone hole, visit:
The Antarctic ozone hole was once regarded as one of the biggest environmental threats, but the discovery of a previously undiscovered feedback shows that it has instead helped to shield this region from carbon-induced warming over the past two decades.
Although the Antarctic ozone hole has stabilized in recent years and is expected to heal in the latter half of this century, climate models that don't include its effects may show an overly optimistic future, said Lenton.
The Antarctic ozone hole, however, will continue to reappear each southern springtime until around the year 2050, he adds.
The Suomi NPP OMPS delivered its first ozone measurements of the Antarctic ozone hole in October 2012, continuing a satellite record dating from the early 1970s.

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