antebellum

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Related to Antebellum South: Antebellum Period

antebellum

Dating before or existing before the US Civil War (1861–1865).
References in periodicals archive ?
Gospel of Disunion: Religion and Separatista in the Antebellum South.
Nevertheless, Christianity, even if only the cultural variety, remained the most noticeable and vibrant religious option in the antebellum South.
Court-ordered sales made up about half of all slave auction sales in antebellum South Carolina, where various county-level officers ordered sales for the settlement of estates, tax delinquency, and failure to pay debts.
The Education of the Southern Belle: Higher Education and Student Socialization in the Antebellum South.
The park interprets the history of the antebellum South and includes the William Johnson House, the home of a former slave who went on to become a successful African-American businessman and diarist
The outfit touts the antebellum South as a righteous society and favors the reintroduction of some forms of slavery (it's sanctioned in the Bible, Reconstructionists say)--which may explain the blindingly monochrome audience at the gathering.
As in most of Walker's work, the story here is based on a real tragedy: Slavery in the antebellum South.
Franklin deals with the experiments in slave breeding in the antebellum South, foreshadowing the Nazis, but this is never mentioned in most American history books.
Much of the book's first half is an apologia for the antebellum South and its cause in the War Between the States (Woods' preferred term).
The idea that design coding is the exclusive product of the American New Urbanists is a myth propagated by people who fear that coding is a synonym for neo-classical architecture reminiscent of the antebellum South.
Kara Walker makes prints, drawings, and installations that evoke the antebellum South and aspects of its history, including power dynamics, and race relations.
Peterson's Ham and Japheth in America (1978), which defended the central place of Noah's Curse to the biblical justification of slavery, but broadens Peterson's focus on the antebellum South.