anthropic principle

(redirected from Anthropic argument)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Anthropic argument: Anthropic principle, Weak anthropic principle

anthropic principle

(an-throp -ik) A principle that was put forward in the 1960s by R. Dicke and maintains that the presence of life in the Universe places constraints on the ways in which the very early Universe evolved: the possible initial conditions are limited to those that give rise to an inhabited Universe, i.e. what we observe must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers.

anthropic principle

[an′thräp·ik ′prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The assertion that the presence of intelligent life on earth places limits on the many ways the universe could have developed and could have caused the conditions of temperature that prevail today.
References in periodicals archive ?
From an Aristotelian point of view, the inflationary cosmos and anthropic arguments are dialectical--that is, arguments intended to show that the conclusion is reasonable given the evidence.
with regard to the anthropic argument, the probability that the universe is finely-tuned cannot be compared to the probability that the universe is devoid of design since the latter cannot be meaningfully calculated.
The anthropic arguments suggest, even apart from their theological implications, how intricately interwoven we are, that mind is not an alien intruder in the universe.