Hominidae

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Hominidae

[hä′min·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of primates in the superfamily Hominoidea containing one living species, Homo sapiens.

Hominidae

 

a family of the order Primates. This family includes modern and fossil (Archanthropus, Palaeoan-thropus) man. Most scientists also include Australopithecines and other biped fossils of the higher primates in the family Hominidae. However, there are researchers who take Hominidae to mean only “genuine” man, starting from Archanthropus. According to the first point of view, the family Hominidae arose toward the end of the Tertiary period (about 3.5 million years ago); according to the second, it arose toward the middle of the Quaternary period (that is, about 1 million years ago).

References in periodicals archive ?
First, his book Intelligenzprufungen an Menschenaffen (1917) (2) detailed his experimental research on intelligence in anthropoid apes, and made him an eminent figure in comparative psychology in those years.
In other words, despite the name and taking into account McCooey's imperfect grasp of zoological categories, the 'Australian ape' was some as yet undiscovered marsupial, an animal both unlike and distinct from the anthropoid apes elsewhere.
It urged Japan to take a leading role in this respect since the nation is at the forefront of study on large-scale anthropoid apes, the sources said.
Many hundreds of thousands of years ago, during an epoch, not yet definitely determined, of that period of the earth's history which geologists call the Tertiary period, most likely toward the end of it, a specially highly developed of anthropoid apes lived somewhere in the tropical zone--probably on a great continent that has sunk to the bottom of the Indian Ocean.
By this time, though, the anthropoid apes were well known, and a Dutch paleontologist, Marie Eugene Francois Thomas Dubois (1858-1941), believed that primitive human beings would be found where the anthropoid apes now were: in sections of Africa and southeast Asia.