pathetic fallacy

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pathetic fallacy

(in literature) the presentation of inanimate objects in nature as possessing human feelings
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In sum, it seems clear that the identification of the anthropomorphic fallacy in international relations discourse meets the criteria for scientific discoveries set forth by the Blake and Rendall study.
Indeed, Waltzian anarchy is undone once the consequences of the discovery of the anthropomorphic fallacy dawn upon us.
4) For Escude's publications on the state-as-person fiction in English in the United States, see "The Anthropomorphic Fallacy in International Relations Discourse", Working Paper #94-6, Center for International Affairs, Harvard University, August 1994, and chapter 2 of Foreign Policy Theory in Menem's Argentina (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1997).
6) It is not that Escude's work on the anthropomorphic fallacy went totally without notice in the Anglo-American world.
References to Escude's anthropomorphic fallacy are included throughout the book, especially in chapter 2, "A Review of the Theoretical Landscape".
In certain extreme cases, the anthropomorphic fallacy became a metaphysical fallacy: "eternal France", a cliche of educational textbooks and political discourse, is a case in point.
Ultimately, the anthropomorphic fallacy and associated phenomena are finely-tuned mechanisms used to mobilize irrational energies at the service of a "national" cause (which is frequently only the cause of an elite).
Yet this self-evident argument is usually obscured by the very power of the anthropomorphic fallacy, a power that is enhanced by its widespread use for centuries, everywhere.
The historical origins of the anthropomorphic fallacy
of collective entities; the essential elitism that underlies such policies; and the incompatibility of these policies with ideals of social justice (especially in the case of countries with large masses of poor people), were all obscured by the functionality acquired by the discourse based on the anthropomorphic fallacy with the emergence of "nation-states".
Indeed, the anthropomorphic fallacy would have made no sense in the medieval world.
Thus, the anthropomorphic fallacy is built into the language of the fields of international law and international relations as a sort of birthmark or original sin.