anthroposphere


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anthroposphere

[an′thrä·pə‚sfir]
(ecology)
The biosphere of the great geological activities of humankind. Also known as noosphere.
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This type of critique is important as it recognises that the science behind planetary-scale geoengineering is part of larger and systematic process of encroachment by the anthroposphere on to the biosphere:
1) While similar terms such as anthrocene and anthroposphere had been proposed previously, Eugene Stoermer and Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen initially advanced the term anthopocene as an analogy to the accepted epoch designation "Holocene" (Syvitski 14).
With essay titles such as, Population Growth, Gaia Theory, Migration, Oceans and Seas, Plant and Animal Domestication, Diseases, Creation Myths, Climate Change, Carrying Capacity, and Anthroposphere, it is obvious that the editors have chosen the essential themes of Big History.
The biotic component of the ecosphere is the biosphere; the abiotic one is called toposphere (Vadineanu, 1998), and includes the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, but also the anthroposphere and its component, the technosphere (Vadineanu, 1998).
The future of the biogeosphere and anthroposphere and its peaceful coevolution will be dependent not only on the development of technologies but to a greater extent, on the harmonisation of technologies with the potential of the environment, based on the cultural heritage of societies.
The latter complex formation can be also dissociated into different spheres: technosphere (made up of settlements, infrastructure elements, archaeological monuments, and land-use patches) (Kavaliauskas and Veteikis 2004), biologic anthroposphere (consisting of humans as alive organisms), sociosphere (expressed mainly by streams and fields of socio-economic forces), and, finally, infosphere (or noosphere, manifested through information field (Kavaliauskas 1992; Kavaliauskas and Veteikis 2004)).
Peter Baccini and Paul Brunner, Metabolism of the Anthroposphere.
The representation of the world as the object of increasing mastery or as the backdrop for an anthroposphere must be destroyed'(Castoriadis, 1999: 179).
KEYWORDS Degrowth, limits to growth, anthroposphere, liberalism, cosmopolitanism, communitarianism, Jeffersonian, Norbert Elias, civilising processes