anticoagulant

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anticoagulant

(ăn'tēkōăg`yələnt), any of several substances that inhibit blood clot formation (see blood clottingblood clotting,
process by which the blood coagulates to form solid masses, or clots. In minor injuries, small oval bodies called platelets, or thrombocytes, tend to collect and form plugs in blood vessel openings.
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). Some anticoagulants, such as the coumarin derivatives bishydroxycoumarin (Dicumarol) and warfarin (Coumadin) inhibit synthesis of prothrombin, a clot-forming substance, and other clotting factors. The coumarin derivatives compete with vitamin K, which is a necessary substance in prothrombin formation (see vitaminvitamin,
group of organic substances that are required in the diet of humans and animals for normal growth, maintenance of life, and normal reproduction. Vitamins act as catalysts; very often either the vitamins themselves are coenzymes, or they form integral parts of coenzymes.
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). They are only effective after the body's existing supply of prothrombin is depleted. Another anticoagulant, heparin, is a polysaccharide (see carbohydratecarbohydrate,
any member of a large class of chemical compounds that includes sugars, starches, cellulose, and related compounds. These compounds are produced naturally by green plants from carbon dioxide and water (see photosynthesis).
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) found naturally in many cells. It acts in several ways: by preventing prothrombin formation; by preventing formation of fibrin, another clotting substance; and by decreasing the availability of a third clotting factor, thrombin. Heparin is obtained by extracting it from animal tissues. Anticoagulants are used to treat blood clots, which appear especially frequently in veins of the legs and pelvis in bedridden patients. Therapy helps to reduce the risk of clots reaching the lung, heart, or other organs. Heparin causes an instantaneous increase in blood-clotting time, and its effect lasts several hours.

anticoagulant

[¦an·tē‚kō′ag·yə·lənt]
(pharmacology)
An agent, such as sodium citrate, that prevents coagulation of a colloid, especially blood.

anticoagulant

1. acting to prevent or impair coagulation, esp of blood
2. an agent, such as warfarin, that prevents or impairs coagulation
References in periodicals archive ?
TB-402, which is given as a single injection post surgery, could overcome the major drawbacks such as bleeding and the need for extensive patient monitoring associated with current anti-coagulant therapy.
It has a long duration of action (over 100 hours) and is not removed from the patient's body during dialysis, unlike unfractionated heparin which in the US is the gold standard anti-coagulant in haemodialysis.
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The report “Atrial Fibrillation Market Analysis By Procedure (Pharmacological Drugs, Anti-arrhythmic, Anti-coagulant, Non-Pharmacological Treatments, Radiofrequency, HIFU, Cryoablation, Microwave, Laser, Catheter Ablation, Maze Surgery, Electric Cardioversion) And Segment Forecasts To 2020,” is available now to Grand View Research customers and can also be purchased directly at http://www.
Huddersfield MP Barry Sheerman revealed in the Commons that more than 3,000 people in the town who have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation are not being given anti-coagulant drugs.
This concern has spurred the development of several other anti-coagulants that are considerably safer and easier to take, but also far more expensive than the generic warfarin.
A NEW home-testing device that will allow patients taking anti-coagulant drugs to check their own blood will soon be on the market thanks to a PS2m investment.
He also saidClinton is being treated with anti-coagulants and would remain at New York-Presbyterian Hospital for at least the next 48 hours so doctors can monitor the medication.
She is being treated with anti-coagulants and is at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital so that they can monitor the medication over the next 48 hours.
She is expected to remain at New York Presbyterian Hospital for the next 48 hours so doctors can monitor her condition and treat her with anti-coagulants, said Philippe Reines, deputy assistant secretary of state.