Antimilitarism

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Antimilitarism

See also Peace, Peacemaking.
All Quiet on the Western Front
unromanticized novel of WWI and its unsung heroes. [Ger. Lit.: All Quiet on the Western Front]
Arjuna
called upon by duty to be a warrior, he refuses to join the fratricidal battle. [Hindu Lit.: The Bhagavad-Gita in Benét, 103]
Arms and the Man
satirizes romantic view of war. [Br. Lit.: Arms and the Man]
Farewell to Arms, A
novel of lovers who flee from war’s horrors. [Am. Lit.: A Farewell to Arms]
Quakers
known for service to peace. [Am. Hist.: EB, 7: 743–745]
Sherston, George
refuses to continue taking part in a war being wrongfully prolonged. [Br. Lit.: Memoirs of an Infantry Officer in Magill I, 579]
Undershaft, Barbara
fights her father’s involvement in munitions manufacture. [Br. Drama: Shaw Mayor Barbara in Magill III, 617]
References in periodicals archive ?
The level of strike activity was so high in France by 1905 that the anti-militarists, no matter how violent their message, "were at their most persuasive when protesting the use of troops to suppress strikes, an issue viewed universally as an immoral affront to their basic rights as French citizens.
This article presents an analysis of mobilization into the antinationalist, anti-militarist, feminist organization Women in Black.
When analyzing the data gathered for the purpose of this project through the lens of social movement theory, I share in the contention of McAdam (7) and Tarrow (8) that participation in activism--and in this type of antinationalist, anti-militarist, feminist high-risk/cost contention in particular--does not by any means occur in the context of disorder, social marginalization, and irrational outbursts of collective behavior but is instead facilitated first, by the various functions of social networks.
This can be seen very clearly in the case of Women in Black: they began their activism within the framework of the mainstream peace movement and were located primarily in the Center for Anti-War Action, from the basis of a clear anti-militarist and anti-nationalist identity that they co-joined with their feminist identity.

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