antinaturalism

(redirected from Anti-naturalism)

antinaturalism

any approach to sociological analysis which opposes the adoption of a natural-science model (e.g. the formulation of natural laws), regarding this as inappropriate to the study of human social action. Reference to ‘naturalism’ in this sense must be distinguished from a different usage of the term ‘naturalism’ in sociology to refer to NATURALISTIC RESEARCH METHODS. Here the emphasis is on the study of social action in ‘naturally’ occurring social settings. In this case, a preference for ‘natural’ research methods is often associated with opposition to the slavish following of any model drawn from the physical sciences. Thus, naturalism in this second sense is often taken as implying ‘antinaturalism’, using naturalism in the first sense.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaugin was raised in an Orleans seminary and became receptive to the theological teachings of Bishop Dupanloup, particularly his idealism and anti-naturalism.
The modanist style, characterized by youthful exuberance and a tongue-in-cheek tone, is illustrated by stories presented in sections on anti-naturalism, foreign settings and exotic personae, the multiple self, and modanizumu in politics.
Special attention is given to Gozzi's eighteenth-century so-called anti-naturalism (an anachronistic concept) and Artaud's theories.
Deemed irreclaimably French, Koltes's works remain bottled inside the peculiarly American politics of Otherness: rhapsodic but oblique, obtuse or enigmatic in their resolute anti-naturalism, teeming with crystal-clear talk but putting forward impenetrable thoughts.
In 1905, Matisse and his group became known as the Fauves or "wild beasts" because of their anti-naturalism and unconventional use of bold and vivid colour.
ID's anti-naturalism is central to the Wedge Strategy.
Playwrights, directors and designers can now use an almost endless variety of devices borrowed from anti-naturalism without threatening the essential naturalism of their work.
Baldwin is the author of the magisterial study of Moore in the Routledge Arguments of the Philosophers series, and here he provides a brief history of Principia, and important and sensitive exegesis and criticism of Moore's anti-naturalism, utilitarianism, and theory of value.