Antigonish

Antigonish

(ăn'tĭgōnĭsh`), town (1991 pop. 4,924), N central N.S., Canada, on an inlet of St. Georges Bay. The town was founded in 1784 by disbanded British soldiers and later settled by Highland Scots. It is known for the Antigonish Movement, a cooperative movement promoted in the 1920s and 30s by St. Francis Xavier Univ.
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The firm has 50 employees, with additional offices in Antigonish, Deer Lake, N.
Antigonish (ANTIG); Saint John (STJ); Charlottetown (CHR); Toronto (TOR); London (LON); Kingston (KIN); Halifax (HAL).
The Jeffers block, which most closely resembles the Antigonish Highlands, shows a major shear zone contact, probably synchronous with the 605 Ma Gunshot Brook Pluton, with the Bass River block, which formed in a more inboard position on the Gondwanan margin.
The Malahat Review, The Fiddlehead, The Antigonish Review, and Prairie
His recent translations will be found in the Antigonish Review and the International Poetry Review (Fall 2000); articles are published or forthcoming in the Explicator and Hamlet Studies.
The show airs on Sundays and can be heard in Nova Scotia on CJFX (AM and FM-stereo) in Antigonish at 7:10 a.
Best has downgraded the ratings of the following Canadian property/casualty companies: Company Rating Antigonish Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance B+ Canassurance General Ins.
ANTIGONISH, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA The Antigonish diocese of will put up about 400 properties for sale in an effort to raise the money necessary to cover legal settlement and sexual abuse lawsuit costs.
Martha of Charlottetown, four PEI women who received their initial religious formation in the Antigonish Marthas' novitiate, returned to PEI with four more experienced Antigonish Sisters of St.
Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, and is a member of the SEG, EAGE and CSEG.
The group also learned about the Coady Institute's 50 years of promoting community-based development and the history of the Antigonish Movement for economic and social justice that began during the 1920s.