Antilochus


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Antilochus

(ăntĭl`əkəs), in Greek mythology, young hero of the Trojan War, a favorite of Achilles. While protecting his father, Nestor, he was killed by Memnon. He was buried with Achilles and Patroclus.
References in classic literature ?
Croiset remark, the abusive Thersites in the "Aethiopis" is clearly copied from the Thersites of the "Iliad"; in the same poem Antilochus, slain by Memnon and avenged by Achilles, is obviously modelled on Patroclus.
Our best men all of them fell there--Ajax, Achilles, Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, a man singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant.
First Antilochus slew an armed warrior of the Trojans, Echepolus, son of Thalysius, fighting in the foremost ranks.
Cleitias names Odysseus, Automedon, Damasippus, Hippothoon, and Diomedes as the five competitors and omits Homer's Eumelus, Menelaus, Antilochus, and Meriones.
15) So we find that the winner of the race, Antilochus son of Nestor, offered to forego his prize to the higher status Menelaus.
7, where the speaker contrasts the Homeric rendition of the story of Antilochus with the gallery tableau ("Such are the paintings/descriptions of Homer, but the drama of the painter is as follows" [[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 2.
Porfirius in Oratium poetam At non ter aeuo functus: dicit: Nestor traditur tribus Nestorem signi-ficat, qui saeculis uixisse, cuius filius traditur tribus saeculis fuit Antilochus (p.
Nestor counsels Antilochus about managing a turn in a chariot race; he gives direct, specific guidance on the appropriate way to lean, use the reins and handle the horses.
Underlying Homer's Iliad there perhaps once existed, for example, versions of the tale in which Helen went to Troy willingly; in which certain heroes like Ajax, Memnon, and Antilochus played more prominent roles; in which the Achaean embassy to Achilles was composed of different characters; in which Patroclus was actually mistaken for Achilles by the Trojans; and in which the extended narrative of the death, mourning, and funeral of a major hero was that of Achilles rather than of Patroclus.
The play begins with, and calls attention to, an image: with an emphatic "as you can see," Odysseus shows Antilochus the Amazon and Greek armies, "Each with its teeth sunk in the other's throat" (5).
In the Aethiopis, Nestor's son Antilochus loses his life rescuing his father from a maimed and tangled chariot on the battlefield, and there are those who believe that the scene in the eighth Iliad, where Nestor is rescued by Diomedes, is based on this scene.