Antilochus


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Antilochus

(ăntĭl`əkəs), in Greek mythology, young hero of the Trojan War, a favorite of Achilles. While protecting his father, Nestor, he was killed by Memnon. He was buried with Achilles and Patroclus.
References in classic literature ?
Our best men all of them fell there--Ajax, Achilles, Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, a man singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant.
First Antilochus slew an armed warrior of the Trojans, Echepolus, son of Thalysius, fighting in the foremost ranks.
Croiset remark, the abusive Thersites in the "Aethiopis" is clearly copied from the Thersites of the "Iliad"; in the same poem Antilochus, slain by Memnon and avenged by Achilles, is obviously modelled on Patroclus.
Nestor counsels Antilochus about managing a turn in a chariot race; he gives direct, specific guidance on the appropriate way to lean, use the reins and handle the horses.
Underlying Homer's Iliad there perhaps once existed, for example, versions of the tale in which Helen went to Troy willingly; in which certain heroes like Ajax, Memnon, and Antilochus played more prominent roles; in which the Achaean embassy to Achilles was composed of different characters; in which Patroclus was actually mistaken for Achilles by the Trojans; and in which the extended narrative of the death, mourning, and funeral of a major hero was that of Achilles rather than of Patroclus.
Exhibits include a photo of a sailor in a popular lifebelt-shaped frame, sent from the Antilochus to Liverpool about 1914.
Diomedes finishes first, Antilochus finishes in second place, but everyone agrees that Eumelos is the best charioteer in the race.
Kurzke is puzzled by Mann's reference to Antilochus, the son of Nestor and trusted friend of Achilles.
When Achilles and Antilochus are ambushed by Paris, Apollo and Pallas try to interfere, but Jupiter (perhaps as guardian of destiny) prevents them:
notes that the locals sacrifice to the Greek heroes Achilleus, Patrocles, Antilochus and Ajax, but not to Heracles, because, they say, he had sacked their city.
After he rails against Antilochus in Iliad 23 in what Chapman calls a "ridiculous speech for conclusion of his character," Menelaus becomes the unwitting victim of Antilochus' sharp wit, though Chapman courteously marks the "ironicall reply" of Nestor's son in his margins so that his readers might recognize what Menelaus does not (468).
Just as Achilles arrives with Antilochus, Paris and his men attack them and after a struggle succeed in killing the two Greeks (VI.