Antimony Halides

Antimony Halides

 

compounds of antimony with halogens. The two types of halides are SbX3, where X is F, Cl, Br, or I, and SbX5, where X is F or Cl. SbF5 and SbCl5 are liquids formed by the reaction of SbF3 and SbCl3 with, respectively, fluorine and chlorine. While SbF5 has no industrial application, SbCl5 is used in organic synthesis. SbCl3, which exists as colorless, hygroscopic crystals, dissolves in hydrochloric and sulfuric acids upon heating and is obtained by the chlorination of antimony or Sb2S3, as well as by dissolving antimony or antimony oxides in hydrochloric acid. This halide is used in obtaining pure antimony trioxide; it also finds use in medicine and in the textile industry. SbF3, which exists as colorless crystals, dissolves readily in water and in hydrofluoric acid; it is produced by dissolving SbCl3 or Sb2(SO4)3 in hydrofluoric acid and is used in the electrolyte during the refining of antimony, as well as in the textile industry. SbBr3 exists as colorless crystals and has almost no practical use. SbI3 is encountered in three modifications, of which the trigonal form is the most common. This halide is obtained by triturating antimony with iodine.

O. E. KREIN

References in periodicals archive ?
formation of antimony halides or oxyhalides which may act by blanketing the flame" [26].
In practical fire systems the halogen species can be introduced into the gas phase by mechanical means, as with Freon protection systems, or by chemical means, as with the release of HCI from decomposing polyvinylchioride, or as phosphorus chlorides or oxychiorides formed during decomposition of a polymer substrate, or as antimony halides from polymer substrates.
1-3] It has been proposed that the solid and vapor phase mechanisms of the phosphorus FR interfere in the volatilization or formation of radical scavengers of antimony halides, possibly forming antimony phosphates.