Antiochus


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Related to Antiochus: Antiochus II, Antiochus III the Great

Antiochus

sexually active with daughter. [Br. Lit.: Pericles]
See: Incest
References in periodicals archive ?
Surprising everyone, probably especially King Antiochus, the Romans proved the far better, more professional army, and the Seleucid army was completely destroyed, with Antiochus losing as many as 50,000 soldiers in the battle.
A year ago, an excavation revealed the remnants of the Hakra, a fortress constructed by the Seleucid king Antiochus IV (the protagonist of the Chanukah story) in order to control the city and supervise the activities in the Temple.
Therein, the ancient author has offered an emotional history of the revolt of the Jews against the Seleucids, whose leader, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, was fiercely intent upon Hellenizing all under his command.
King Antiochus has kept suitors from marrying by requiring that they answer a riddle correctly or die.
The fact that, in 205BC, King Antiochus III stopped at Tylos on his way to Gerrha, a place in Saudi Arabia, is also considered evidence of the presence of the naval base.
In the time of the Romans, Magnesia was added to the kingdom of Pergamus, after Antiochus had been driven eastward beyond Mount Taunts.
In the second paper, Geert De Breucker, the author of an excellent new edition and translation of the fragments of Berossos in Brill's New Jacoby (BNJ 680), comprehensively analyzes the evidence for Berossos' life and work, arguing that Berossos' work cannot be dated more closely than to the reign of Antiochus I (295/4-261 B.
Antiochus, who ruled the empire from 175 BC until his death in 164 BC, forbade Jews from practicing their religion, and they in return refused to worship the Greek gods, starting an uprising and eventually rededicating the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.
The story, as we all know, is that at the urging of the Tobiads, an assimilationist faction of Hellenist Jews, the Syrian-Greek monarch Antiochus IV Epiphanes invaded Judea and immediately set about abolishing all expressions of Judaism, including the dedication of an altar to Zeus in the Jewish temple in Jerusalem.
Researchers have long debated over the location of the Acra, built more than 2,000 years ago by Antiochus Epiphanes, king of the Hellenized Seleucid empire.
Antiochus, who lived from 215-164 BC, chose the spot for the Acra in order to control the city and monitor activity in the Jewish temple, said Doron Ben-Ami, who led the excavation.
For instance, the pentagon, another symbol of health, simply "is" because Alexander the Great gave it to Antiochus as such, and Antiochus afterward inscribed it on his medals.