Antiochus IV


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Related to Antiochus IV: Mattathias, Hasmonean Dynasty, Maccabean revolt

Antiochus IV

(Antiochus Epiphanes) (āntī`əkəs ēpĭf`ənēz), d. 163 B.C., king of Syria (175 B.C.–163 B.C.), son of Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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 and successor of his brother Seleucus IV. His nephew (later Demetrius IDemetrius I
(Demetrius Soter) , c.187–150 B.C., king of ancient Syria (162–150 B.C.), son of Seleucus IV. He was sent as a hostage to Rome, where he remained during the reigns of his father and his uncle Antiochus IV.
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) was held as a hostage in Rome, although still claiming the throne. Antiochus is best known for his attempt to Hellenize Judaea and extirpate Judaism—a policy that instigated the rebellion of the MaccabeesMaccabees
or Machabees
, Jewish family of the 2d and 1st cent. B.C. that brought about a restoration of Jewish political and religious life. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon.
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. Antiochus invaded Egypt, which was torn by strife between Ptolemy VIPtolemy VI
(Ptolemy Philometor) , d. 145 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (180–145 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy V. He became king when an infant, and his mother, Cleopatra, was regent.
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 and his brother (later Ptolemy VIIIPtolemy VIII
(Ptolemy Physcon) , d. 116 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (145–116 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, brother of Ptolemy VI. He is also called Ptolemy Euergetes II. He was coruler with his brother and his brother's wife from 170–164 B.C.
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), and would probably have conquered that region if the Romans had not intervened in his siege of Alexandria (168). Antiochus was briefly succeeded by his son, Antiochus V, a boy king who was overthrown by Demetrius I.

Antiochus IV

?215--164 bc, Seleucid king of Syria (175--164), who attacked the Jews and provoked the revolt of the Maccabees
References in periodicals archive ?
In the spring of 164 BC, Antiochus IV Epiphanes gave up all hope of recovery.
Doran postulates that Antiochus IV Epiphanes' prohibition of circumcision, Sabbath, and dietary laws was based on the premise that ancestral laws must not be followed, not knowing that Judean ethnic mores were rooted in the religious ikkar (principle) of the One God, which seeded the successful Hasmonean rebellion.
In the secular world it runs parallel to Christmas gift giving but with this paper folding delight the story of the lighting of the eight menorah candles is told simply, not dwelling on the ancient Maccabean victory over Antiochus IV Epiphanes but rather delivering a message of hope and peace for the future.
It records the exploits of the Maccabean family (later called Hasmoneans) in their revolt against Antiochus IV Epiphanes and his aggressive campaign to Hellenize (24) the land of Israel.
The best-known account is that it commemorates an episode in the time of Hellenistic persecution of the Jews under Antiochus IV Ephiphanes during the second century BCE, the time of the Second Temple.
Three years later, Seleucus IV was assassinated and was succeeded by his son Antiochus IV, who was the ruler, who according to II Maccabees, eventually issued an edict of persecution against the Jewish people and desecrated the Temple in Jerusalem leading to the Maccabean Revolt.
It was in the time when the land of Israel was part of the Syrian empire, under the rule of King Antiochus IV and life began to get tough for the Jewish people.
Some 150 years after Alexander's death, the Greek Syrian ruler Antiochus IV, Epiphanies -- ``god incarnate,'' as he referred to himself -- instituted policies that were completely opposite of Alexander's.
Thus, for example, if II Maccabees 5:16 complains that Antiochus IV touched the holy vessels with "impure hands .
Hanukkah is the Jewish Festival of Lights, an eight-day commemoration of the rededication of the temple in Jerusalem by the Macabees after their victory over Syrian tyrant Antiochus IV in about 165 B.
In 164 BCE, a small band of Jewish rebels called Maccabees ("hammers") managed through hit-and-run tactics to defeat the powerful Seleucid army of Antiochus IV and drive his Greek overlords from Judea.