Antiochus IV


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Related to Antiochus IV: Mattathias, Hasmonean Dynasty, Maccabean revolt

Antiochus IV

(Antiochus Epiphanes) (āntī`əkəs ēpĭf`ənēz), d. 163 B.C., king of Syria (175 B.C.–163 B.C.), son of Antiochus IIIAntiochus III
(Antiochus the Great), d. 187 B.C., king of Syria (223–187 B.C.), son of Seleucus II and younger brother of Seleucus III, whom he succeeded. At his accession the Seleucid empire was in decline.
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 and successor of his brother Seleucus IV. His nephew (later Demetrius IDemetrius I
(Demetrius Soter) , c.187–150 B.C., king of ancient Syria (162–150 B.C.), son of Seleucus IV. He was sent as a hostage to Rome, where he remained during the reigns of his father and his uncle Antiochus IV.
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) was held as a hostage in Rome, although still claiming the throne. Antiochus is best known for his attempt to Hellenize Judaea and extirpate Judaism—a policy that instigated the rebellion of the MaccabeesMaccabees
or Machabees
, Jewish family of the 2d and 1st cent. B.C. that brought about a restoration of Jewish political and religious life. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon.
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. Antiochus invaded Egypt, which was torn by strife between Ptolemy VIPtolemy VI
(Ptolemy Philometor) , d. 145 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (180–145 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, son of Ptolemy V. He became king when an infant, and his mother, Cleopatra, was regent.
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 and his brother (later Ptolemy VIIIPtolemy VIII
(Ptolemy Physcon) , d. 116 B.C., king of ancient Egypt (145–116 B.C.), of the Macedonian dynasty, brother of Ptolemy VI. He is also called Ptolemy Euergetes II. He was coruler with his brother and his brother's wife from 170–164 B.C.
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), and would probably have conquered that region if the Romans had not intervened in his siege of Alexandria (168). Antiochus was briefly succeeded by his son, Antiochus V, a boy king who was overthrown by Demetrius I.

Antiochus IV

?215--164 bc, Seleucid king of Syria (175--164), who attacked the Jews and provoked the revolt of the Maccabees
References in periodicals archive ?
He thinks the concept may derive from the somewhat similar function of the gymnasium introduced by Antiochus IV, a development strenuously objected to in both 1 and 2 Maccabees.
So oppressive was Antiochus IV, a Jewish civil war erupted.
The persecutions of Antiochus IV made the situation worse, with Jewish practice which distinguished between Israel and the nations, such as circumcision and food laws, forbidden.
The second story: Antiochus IV Epiphanes of Syria took Jerusalem and installed a garrison of Macedonians, but impious and wicked Jews also lived there, according to Josephus, who caused their co-citizens much suffering (Antiquities 12:246, 252; narrative time: second century BCE).
168, 175), Antiochus IV Epiphanes (chapter five: Ant.
Based on a critical textual analysis of the Book of Daniel, it is hypothesized that it was specifically written as a theological-political tractate addressed to the Judean Hasidim during their persecution by Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid-Greek occupier of Israel.
This reached its climax when the Greek king Antiochus IV decreed that Judaism was abolished, Greek gods would be worshipped and anyone disobeying, or caught observing Jewish practices, would be killed.
Yet, somehow against the stronger and better-armed occupiers, the Jewish people, under the leadership of the Maccabees, overthrew them and their cruel leader, Antiochus IV.
Antiochus IV Epiphanes then ordered his whole kingdom to be Greek in customs, language, religion, everything.
In any event, Jason's move constituted a bold step in the city's adaptation to the wider world, a process that would be interrupted - albeit only temporarily - by the persecutions of Antiochus IV and the resultant Maccabean revolt.
In 167 BCE, Seleucid king Antiochus IV Epiphanes issued an edict against Judean religious practices.