Antiope


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Antiope

(ăntī`əpē), in Greek mythology. 1 Theban princess, daughter of Nycteus. She was seduced by Zeus and bore him twin sons, Zethus and Amphion. Fleeing to Sicyon to escape the wrath of her father, she was forced to abandon her infants on Mt. Cithaeron, where they were raised by shepherds. Antiope was pursued and captured by her uncle Lycus, then king of Thebes, and his wife Dirce, who treated her with great cruelty. Later the sons of Antiope revenged their mother; they dethroned Lycus and punished Dirce by tying her to the horns of a bull. They then erected a wall around Thebes with stones which moved of their own will to the music of Amphion's lyre. Zethus married the nymph Thebe, who gave her name to Thebes. Amphion married Niobe. 2 A queen of the Amazons, sister of Hippolyte. According to one legend she was abducted by Theseus and became the mother of Hippolytus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Eddison's work, therefore, it is important to note that Antiope is a keen hunter, and not just because she has offered Derxis a boar-hunt.
During a pause in her hunt, furthermore, Antiope is described in these terms:
It is worth noting especially that the stories of Atis, Antiope, Antinoe, Auge, Daphne, Ariadne, Callirhoe, Cephalus, Coresus and Callisto appear on local coins.
A fabulous painting by Hendrick Goltzius, Jupiter and Antiope, on offer at Sotheby's New York on 28 January is no exception (Fig.
Antiope is about to be seduced by the god in the form of a satyr whose revoltingly lecherous expression and direction of gaze leave us in no doubt of his intentions.
Mercatante in "World Mythology and Legend," Laocoon offended Apollo by marrying Antiope and "laying with her" before the god's statue.
The crude modelling of the face of his uncle, Francois Buron (private collection, New York) and the clumsy forms of the Jupiter and Antiope (Musee de Sens) indicate how much he had yet to learn in his early twenties.
The subjects range from self-portraits to mythology (left: Jupiter and Antiope, 1659).
When it comes to painting sensual female nudes, Correggio is Titian's main rival in the first half of the sixteenth century, and the obvious comparisons are between the standing Venus in Correggio's so-called School of Love and Titian's Venus anadyomene, and between the reclining Venus in Corrreggio's so-called Jupiter and Antiope and the foreground nude in Titian's Bacchanal of the Andrians.
Two works by these artists show how each attempted to rival Rubens's mastery of the female nude: Van Dyck's arresting Jupiter and Antiope (c.