Antislavery


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Antislavery

Abolitionists
activist group working to free slaves. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 1]
Emancipation Proclamation
edict issued by Abraham Lincoln freeing the slaves (1863). [Am. Hist.: EB, III: 869]
Free Soil Party
Abolitionist political party before Civil War. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 3]
Jayhawkers
antislavery guerrillas fighting on Union side in Civil War. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 256]
Laus Deo!
poem written to celebrate emancipation of slaves. [Am. Lit.: “Laus Deo!” in Hart, 460]
Liberator
William Lloyd Garrison’s virulently Abolitionist newspaper. [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 142]
Lincoln, Abraham
(1809–1865) sixteenth U.S. president; issued Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 286–287]
North Star
newspaper supporting emancipation founded by Frederick Douglass. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 607]
Shelby, George
vows to devote self to freeing slaves. [Am. Lit.: Uncle Tom’s Cabin]
Stowe, Harriet Beecher
(1811–1896) author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, influential Abolitionist novel. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 481]
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
highly effective, sentimental Abolitionist novel. [Am. Lit.: Jameson, 513]
Underground Railroad
system which helped slaves to escape to the North. [Am. Hist.: EB, X: 255]
References in periodicals archive ?
In nine chronologically organized chapters, Morris demonstrates how Oberlin's antislavery influence expanded throughout the antebellum period.
This was, of course, only a small representation of the hostility that many Irish-American politicians and papers had toward abolition and antislavery.
Drawing on his deep expertise in the history of abolitionism, Foner demonstrates that one cannot understand the origins of the American Civil War without taking into account the resistance and activism of fugitive slaves and their antislavery allies.
The other chapters cover slavery, antislavery, and abolition.
Unlike the Garrisonians, many of whom became anarchists, these antislavery constitutionalists favored political action.
The authors also focus on Darwin's personal abolitionist roots, pointing to the antislavery activists in his family and the antislavery activity of his wife.
Both were picked to balance the ticket with Burr, a New York commercial lawyer who opposed slavery, contrasting as sharply with Jefferson, an agrarian-minded Virginia slave owner, as the Charleston slaveholder Pinckney did with the antislavery Boston attorney Adams.
During the 1820s, black antislavery reformers, disillusioned by the nation's rejection of abolition and angered by the American Colonization Society's 1817 plan to send free blacks to Africa, embraced more radical measures.
Working from scripts and published plays as well as from playbills, reviews, advertisements, diaries and notes kept by theater managers, newspapers, novels, political cartoons, proslavery and antislavery propaganda, speeches, and pamphlets, she addresses both the plays themselves and their informing backgrounds, reconstructing details of plot and character from ancillary materials in cases where there is no primary source available.
After meeting with antislavery leaders, she dismissed her few remaining white students and announced that she would open a new school for black girls only.
1859: John Brown, antislavery campaigner, was executed for treason in Charleston, West Virginia.
To support it, please visit the "campaigns" section of antislavery.