Antoninus Pius


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Antoninus Pius

(Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus) (ăntōnī`nəs pī`əs), A.D. 86–A.D. 161, Roman emperor (138–161). After a term as consul (120) he went as proconsul to Asia, where he governed with distinction. He was adopted by the emperor Hadrian and, on succeeding him, administered the empire with marked ability and integrity. Italy was embellished with fine buildings, and the provinces were eased of much of their financial burden. During his reign the Wall of Antoninus was built in Britain. His wife was Faustina, aunt of his successor, Marcus AureliusMarcus Aurelius
(Marcus Aelius Aurelius Antoninus) , 121–180, Roman emperor, named originally Marcus Annius Verus. He was a nephew of Faustina, the wife of Antoninus Pius, who adopted him. Marcus married Antoninus' daughter, another Faustina.
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Antoninus Pius

 

Born 86; died 161. Roman emperor from 138.

Antoninus Pius was the descendant of a senatorial family from the city of Nemausus (now Nîmes) in Transalpine Gaul. In 120 he was consul and later proconsul of the province of Asia. In 138 he was adopted by the emperor Hadrian. Becoming emperor after the death of Hadrian, he continued the latter’s foreign policy: he avoided wars and erected new defense structures along the borders of the state (for instance, the “Antonine Wall” in Britain). Antoninus Pius worked in close contact with the Senate, and his social policy was carried out in the interests of the wealthy classes. This caused dissatisfaction and uprisings among the masses in the provinces (in Egypt, Dacia, Achaea, Judaea, and Africa).

REFERENCE

Hüttl, W. Antoninus Pius. Prague, 1936.

Antoninus Pius

86--161 ad, emperor of Rome (138--161); adopted son and successor of Hadrian
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